Undergraduate Courses

  Anthropology & Archaeology   Arabic Art
Art History Business   Communication Studies  
Creative Writing & Literature   Environmental Science   Economics
Education Film Studies Finance



Anthropology & Archaeology

ARC/ARH 309 Ancient European Art and Archaeology Development of European Mediterranean societies and civilizations from the arrival of the first humans upto the Roman conquest of the continent. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

ARC/ART 310 Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations Overview of the Mediterranean Basin from the first civilizations in Egypt and Middle-East up to the Roman expansion over Europe. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

Arabic

ARAB 101102 Elementary Modern Standard Arabic 6 credits An introduction to the phonology and writing system of modern standard Arabic, its basic vocabulary, and structure. Students will learn foundations of Arabic script and build vocabulary to read and engage in simple conversation.

Art

ART 309 Art Criticism and Aesthetics Seminar I The Art Criticism seminar offers the student access to a wide variety of images (architectural, sculptural, painted, etc.). The objective of this course is to improve critical awareness and to refine judgment based on an exploration of universal principles through visual experience. The seminar takes students into an in-depth study of the basic elements of form: color, value, light, and volume. Field studies included.

Art 310 Art Criticism and Aesthetics Seminar II Artworks and texts from varying periods and cultures throughout history are compared and contrasted to explore diverse issues such as the imagination, symbol in art, Zen principles in eastern art, motif, and tradition. Field studies included.

ART 100 Drawing I Foundation The overarching purpose of the studio drawing courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work, and museum study. Combined total of 6 hours of instruction per week in both the studio and outside in the landscape, as well as excursions to European museums.

ART 200 Drawing II Intermediate The overarching purpose of the studio drawing courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work, and museum study. Combined total of 6 hours of instruction per week in both the studio and outside in the landscape, as well as excursions to European museums.

ART 300 Drawing III Advanced I The overarching purpose of the studio drawing courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work, and museum study. Combined total of 6 hours of instruction per week in both the studio and outside in the landscape, as well as excursions to European museums.

ART 400 Drawing III Advanced II – (Pre-Requisite ART 300) The overarching purpose of the studio drawing courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work, and museum study. Combined total of 6 hours of instruction per week in both the studio and outside in the landscape, as well as excursions to European museums.

ART 130 Painting I Foundation The overarching purpose of the studio painting courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work, and museum study. Combined total of 6 hours of instruction per week in both the studio and outside in the landscape, as well as excursions to European museums.

ART 230 Painting II Intermediate The overarching purpose of the studio painting courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work, and museum study. Combined total of 6 hours of instruction per week in both the studio and outside in the landscape, as well as excursions to European museums.

ART 330 Painting III Advanced The overarching purpose of the studio painting courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work, and museum study. Combined total of 6 hours of instruction per week in both the studio and outside in the landscape, as well as excursions to European museums.

ART 350 Painting III Advanced II – (Pre-Requisite ART 330) The overarching purpose of the studio painting courses, at all levels, is to develop the student’s capacity to look both into the visible world and into themselves with the intention of transforming their vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms. This is achieved through disciplined study in the landscape, through portraiture and model work, and museum study. Combined total of 6 hours of instruction per week in both the studio and outside in the landscape, as well as excursions to European museums.

ART 105 Drawing & Painting (Studio Art) Intended for students with little or no experience in painting and drawing. Includes work from the figure, museum study, still-life, and landscape work in the Aix countryside. 6 contact hours per week.

ART 106 Drawing & Painting (Studio Art) Intended for students with little or no experience in painting and drawing. Includes work from the figure, museum study, still-life, and landscape work in the Aix countryside.

ART 305 Intermediate/Advanced Drawing & Painting Intended for students with intermediate to advanced skills in painting and drawing. Includes work from thefigure, museum study, still-life, and landscape work in the Aix countryside.

ART 306 Intermediate/Advanced Drawing & Painting Intended for students with intermediate to advanced skills in painting and drawing. Includes work from the figure, museum study, still-life, and landscape work in the Aix countryside. Additional fee required.

ART 151 Multimedia and Contemporary Studio Practice – Beginner Level A wide range of approaches and media are used to develop greater perceptual and conceptual awareness and understanding of 20th and 21st century studio practice. The course will investigate how drawing and painting relate to other media such as installation, performance, photography, and new technologies. With a focus on issues revolving around the "sacred" and the "taboo" in art, past and present, students will link critical thinking and analysis to their studio practice.

ART 351 Multimedia and Contemporary Studio Practice – Intermediate & Advanced Level A wide range of approaches and media are used to develop greater perceptual and conceptual awareness and understanding of 20th and 21st century studio practice. The course will investigate how drawing and painting relate to other media such as installation, performance, photography, and new technologies. With a focus on issues revolving around the "sacred" and the "taboo" in art, past and present, students will link critical thinking and analysis to their studio practice.

ART 375 Ceramics Intended for students with or without experience in ceramics or pottery.  Includes instruction in ceramics fundamentals, such as an understanding of the physical preparation of materials and beginning techniques in forming decorative ceramic pieces, as well as advanced instruction in a broad array of techniques, depending on the students’ individual pursuits and skill level.

ART 380 Arts Management How does one prepare to work as a manager in a museum, gallery, theater, concert hall, or performing group? What do working artists need to know about interacting with the business side of art? How do French and American cultural support programs impact arts managers and artists? This course introduces the world of arts management to students from a variety of backgrounds. We explore some of the ways art and business intersect by examining theories and practical techniques for professional arts administrators, including: building an arts community, strategic planning for arts organizations, mission and program development, fundraising, financial management, and marketing.

ART 385 Sculpture This sculpture course will challenge students to use limited materials in creative ways to tell their story – or the story of someone else. What can you communicate to your audience through a three-dimensional portrait? This course will engage students with a variety of common materials (paper, cardboard, tape, wire, plastilina, and clay) and result in an exhibition through which our class will introduce themselves or their subjects to the community. What story will you tell?

ART 395 Architectural Design Architecture is the art of designing spaces and experiences in built form. This studio design course will investigate the experiential qualities of architecture in and around Aix-en-Provence and at the Marchutz Art Studio, designed by architect Fernand Pouillon, to explore and develop architectural intuition. Working within the rich 17th and 18th century architectural traditions of Aix and the surrounding environs, students will use empirical study to develop a personal, authentic approach to design.

Art History

ART/ARH 231 Survey History of Western Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages Initiation to the language and techniques of art history, and study of painting, sculpture, and architectureof Western art from prehistory to the end of the Middle Ages. Typically includes an excursion to sites in theregion.

ART/ARH 232 Survey History of Western Art: Renaissance to Present Study of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present. Typically includes an excursion to Paris.

ARC/ARH 309 Ancient European Art and Archaeology Development of European Mediterranean societies and civilizations from the arrival of the first humans upto the Roman conquest of the continent. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

ARC/ART 310 Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations Overview of the Mediterranean Basin from the first civilizations in Egypt and Middle-East up to the Roman expansion over Europe. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

ART/ARH 320 Picasso, Matisse, and the Mediterranean Understanding early 20th century art through an investigation of its sources in Mediterranean myth andreality.

ART/ARH 340 Medieval Art and Architecture A search for the medieval mind as it is expressed in Christian art and architecture from its earliestbeginnings in the Catacombs of Rome, through the rich mosaics and domes of byzantine culture to theraising of the great Gothic cathedrals in northern Europe. Typically includes excursions to regional sites.

ART/ARH 341 Islamic Art of Europe This course studies the interface of Islamic visual cultures and European art and architecture from the 8thcentury until nowadays. It explores the cultural interactions which took place, interactions which haveprovided inspiration for European architects and artists throughout the centuries. Field study will take usto southern Spain, where we’ll witness the artistic heritage of more than 700 years of Muslim rule.

LIT/COM/ANTH 375 The European City in Literature and the Visual Arts Exploration of the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilization through cinema, the novel, poetry, music, and paintings. Typically includes an excursion to sites in Paris.

ART/ARH 381 The XIXth Century and French Impressionism Historical and critical analysis of painting in the 19th century with emphasis on the history ofImpressionism. Typically includes an excursion to sites in Paris.

ART/ARH 382 Cezanne and Van Gogh In-depth study of the lives and works of Paul Cézanne and Vincent van Gogh. Typically includes site visits.

FRE/LIT/ART 411 Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context – 4 credits Course proposes an exploration of literary and artistic themes related to the notion of space, both personal (internal) and geographic (external), and specifically the tensions created by the crossing (“Traversée”) between one space and another.

FRE/LIT/ART 413 Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context – 4 credits Course proposes an exploration of literary and artistic themes related to the notion of space, both personal (internal) and geographic (external), and specifically the tensions created by the crossing (“Traversée”) between one space and another.

Business

BUS 301 International Business Today and Tomorrow Businesses face a new dynamic, one that poses significant challenges as well as opportunities – the need to“green” their products and services. Many analysts forecast that environmentally driven businesses willrepresent one of the world’s major forces and industries in the 21st century. This course also analysesissues of constant change by focusing on the internet and robotics, info-tech and social media in thepromotional mix, legal and ethical practice, entrepreneurial activity, socially responsible business, andbusiness culture and etiquette.

BUS 302 Global Brand Management The focus of the project-based class is to explore how to build innovative brands, where brand is definedas “a sensibility” or a “reputation” - departing from traditional perspectives of brand.

BUS 303 Intercultural Management Fast-paced changes in innovative management in recent years, from mono-cultural to multicultural, frommono-linguistic to multilingual, has deeply affected the needs of global business and the hiring of globalnomads and experienced expatriates in our shifting companies and organizations. This course will raiseawareness on managing innovative and intercultural Human Resource to achieve new 21st century goals indiversity and inclusion and new solutions to the challenges and opportunities international work forces cangenerate.

BUS 304 Business Ethics in the Global Market This course investigates ethical problems in business practice. Topics include personal morality in profit-orientedenterprises; codes of ethics, obligations to employees and other stakeholders; truth inadvertising, whistle-blowing, and company loyalty; self and government regulation; the logic and future ofcapitalism; and the changing responsibilities of the manager in a rapidly globalizing business environment.

BUS 305 Global Marketing Exploration of basic knowledge of global marketing focusing on the impact of environment on the strategies used by firms, and the understanding of consumer behavior management as it relates to the development and implementation of global marketing strategies.

BUS 307 Luxury Management The course will introduce students to luxury management with prime focus on the creation of case studies for luxury brands, professional seminars and educational trips in luxury capitals that include Paris and Monaco. The aim of this high-level course is to expose the students in the world of luxury and how to manage brands and companies in this domain, attaining key knowledge in essential areas in luxury marketing, sales, e-commerce, legal affairs, and branding.

BUS 309 International Entrepreneurship An introduction to entrepreneurship on both a macro and micro level. On the micro level, students have the unique opportunity to examine the entrepreneurial process in France while on the macro level, students analyze the broader entrepreneur mindset and concept development. This course based on experiential learning includes extensive readings, case study analysis, and culminates in a team project emphasizing venture implementation.

BUS/FRE 311 Business French Intensive training in French for business and commercial purposes, emphasizing specialized forms and vocabulary.

BUS 323 Socially Responsible and Sustainable Fashion Management The objective of this course is to investigate the many social and environmental issues of today’s fast-paced, global fashion industry and to explore ways in which we can slow it down, reduce its impact on the environment and provide urgent solutions to make it sustainable. The course takes a hands-on approach, encouraging students to explore aspects of sustainability in developing strategies and methods for the future through case studies, a visit to a sustainable fashion business, videos, and class interaction.

BUS/FRE 341 Internship Internship positions in various enterprises from small local businesses to regional chains to multi-nationals with offices in the Aix area. Students usually work 10-12 hours per week on site, submitting regular written reports to their professors at IAU. An upper-intermediate level of French or higher is essential. Availability depends on company offers. Flexible hours according to your course schedule.

WS/MKT 302 Wine Marketing and Analysis This course is a combination of lecture and professional tasting to analyze the quality levels, marketing of wine, import and export, sales positioning, and pricing structures. Students will learn vineyard and winemaking techniques utilized to achieve certain styles of wine. Course includes Field Studies to wineries and vineyards.

WS/HSP 307 Wine and Food Pairing for the Sommelier This course is a combination of lecture, professional tasting, and wine and food pairing. Students will learn vineyard and winemaking techniques utilized to achieve certain styles of wine, and how the structure of wine and food complete a pairing. Course includes field studies to restaurants, wineries, and to meet guest chefs.

WS/BUS 310 International Wine Trade This course provides students with an understanding of the business aspects of the global wine trade. Subjects include business planning, finance, supply chain management, wine as an alternative investment, and how the media affects the pricing and buyer/seller cycle of wine industry.

Communication Studies

LIT/COM 312 Provençal Culture, from Myth to Media Representations of Provence across media, including myths and legends, memoirs, lyric poetry, literature, comics, film, television, and radio. Students will read texts about Provence from prominent authors and social scientists, and will engage in critical discussion of these texts in the light of their growing understanding of Provençal culture.

COM/HIS 314 France during the Occupation: 1939-1945 The study of representations of France during World War II in history, literature, and media, in both the Occupied and Unoccupied Zones, the German presence, the government in Vichy and the Resistance. The course includes a review of French and European history from World War I until 1940, a detailed look at France's role in World War II, and a survey of French attitudes about the Occupation during the 70 years following Liberation. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

COM/IR 316 Media and Conflict This course examines the role media play in the progression and public perceptions of conflict. Relevant topics will include media and military intervention, portrayals of protest movements, and news and entertainment coverage of crime, rumors, domestic politics, violence, and ethnicity.

LIT/COM/ANTH 375 The European City in Literature and the Visual Arts Exploration of the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilization through cinema, the novel, poetry, music, and paintings. Typically includes an excursion to sites in Paris.

Creative Writing & Literature

ART 270 Creative Writing and the Intercultural Experience – Beginners The study and practice of creative nonfiction writing in relation to the study abroadexperience. Techniques of writing creative nonfiction and development of the creative process, includingwriting exercises, editing, and workshop. The course will examine the ways in which the writing processand cross-cultural experiences are parallel endeavors that can serve to inform and answer each other.

ART 370 Creative Writing and the Intercultural Experience – Intermediate/Advanced The study and practice of creative nonfiction writing in relation to the study abroadexperience. Techniques of writing creative nonfiction and development of the creative process, includingwriting exercises, editing, and workshop. The course will examine the ways in which the writing processand cross-cultural experiences are parallel endeavors that can serve to inform and answer each other.

Environmental Science

ES 200 Ecology of France and the Mediterranean Environment Survey of current theories and practices in ecology. Course examines the varying processes of the Earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere drawing from the example of the Mediterranean Basin. Topics include geological processes and hazards, water resources, waste management, energy and mineral resources, and human impact on global climate change in this sensitive region. Three class hours and laboratory field study throughout the area. Prerequisite: laboratory work in any other hard science.

ECO/ES 301 International Economics and the European Union The effects of greater freedom and liquidity in world trade will be critically analyzed and explained, especially in the light of recent controversy concerning ’globalization.' We shall assess the performance of European Union, as a project of regional economic integration intended to redress many of the alleged defects of the liberalized trade model, and ask whether and how it might offer a viable solution to the need to preserve economic and social cohesion and meet institutional pre-requisites of economic development.

WS/ES 305 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Wine Production An introduction to the chemical and biochemical transformation of grapes into wine with highlights on the key steps in this process: growing conditions, timing of harvest, the fermentation process, wine conservation, and aging techniques. The course discusses equally environmental issues concerning the winemaking industry, especially the consequences of climate change and disposal of wineries’ wastes.

POL/ES 309 Global Environmental Politics Exploration of the main environmental problems facing the international community today with an analysis of the roles of states, international organizations, multinational corporations, and civil societies in the causation and solution process.

Economics

ECO/ES 301 International Economics and the European Union The effects of greater freedom and liquidity in world trade will be critically analyzed and explained, especially in the light of recent controversy concerning ’globalization.' We shall assess the performance of European Union, as a project of regional economic integration intended to redress many of the alleged defects of the liberalized trade model, and ask whether and how it might offer a viable solution to the need to preserve economic and social cohesion and meet institutional pre-requisites of economic development.

WS/ECO 303 Regional Wine Trade and Economics This course examines the economic impact of the wine trade. Coursework includes studies in wine regions, styles, quality, analysis of regional market activities and promotion, current events, and specific tastings. Course includes Field Studies to wineries and vineyards. Extra fee required.

Education

EDU 303 Sociology of Education: A Comparative Approach This course will study key theories in sociology to examine how present-day mass schooling works in France. From this core model, we will also examine aspects of educational systems in other countries. Students of Sociology of Education will be required to teach in a school for one hour a week offering teaching experience as well as the chance to be a central part of the Aix-en-Provence culture.

FRE/LING/EDU 391 Acquisition of the French Language: History and Perspective This course asks students to step back and ask the question: “What happens when I’m learning French?” We will reveal a wider understanding of our own practices as learners, more specifically as learners of French. Students will be challenged to question their own preconceptions. More than a theoretical exercise, they will also be asked to put their ideas into practice. The course develops analytical, critical, and argumentative skills, requiring a precise use of the French language.

Film Studies

FRE/FLM 355 France as seen through its Movies, Post WWII to the 1970’s This course proposes an historical, cultural, and esthetic approach to French films made between the end of the second World War and the 1970s. How do the films describe the dominant elements of a society and how they witness as well as create these representations?

FRE/FLM 356 France as seen through its Movies, The 1980’s to Today Study of the different facets of France — from literary imagination to social issues, from the 1980’s to today — through a varied selection of films.

FRE/THE 357 Communication in French Theatre Course focuses on oral communication through reading, recitation, study, and interpretation of modern theatrical texts. Students will demonstrate elocution of French language with texts from playwrights as diverse as Beckett, Camus, Reza, and Delerme. Course develops strategies for more precise use of French for oral presentations or even job/internship interviews.

Finance

FIN 300 Financial Management This course is an introduction to the main areas of corporate finance. Its focus is on developing an understanding of the tools and methodologies available to the financial manager for decision-making in capital budgeting, working capital management, capital structure, and profit planning and control.

French

FRE 101 102 Practical Elementary French I then II 6 credits A year of college credit in one semester intended for those with little or no previous study. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ workshops and activities. Development of an understanding of oral French through listening and speaking practices.

FRE 102 201 Practical Elementary French II then Intermediate French I 6 credits A year of college credit in one semester intended for those who have completed the equivalent of one semester of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ practical workshops and activities. Development of an understanding of oral French through dialogue and roleplaying.

FRE 201 202 Intermediate French I then II 6 credits A year of college credit in one semester intended for those who have completed the equivalent of two semesters of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ practical workshops and activities. Development of oral French through conversation.

FRE 202 Intermediate French II – 4 credits Intended for those who have completed the equivalent of three semesters of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning. Development of oral French through conversation.

FRE 211 Living in France: Intercultural Communication Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two to three semesters of college level French. Intensive focus on oral practice looking at popular French culture.

FRE 218 France, Francophonie, and Music Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two to three semesters of college level French. Intensive focus on linguistic and cultural comprehension as well as oral expression through music in France and throughout the Francophone world.

FRE 301 Advanced French I: Structure and Expression Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of four semesters or two years of college level French. Advanced written and oral practice and grammar review. Essay topics follow a simulation enriched with a variety of documentation and multimedia activities.

FRE 302 Advanced French II: Conversation and Composition Intended for student who have completed the equivalent of five semesters of college level. Students improve their advanced command of oral and written French.

FRE 306 Cross-Cultural Studies in Food and Culture Both the Mediterranean diet and French Gastronomy have been declared by UNESCO as world heritage. This course will explore the language and the culinary customs of French cuisine, examining differences in food patterns between the U.S. and France, the fundamentals of French and regional food and eating, including the history, and use of ingredients, as well as political and economic factors affecting rural French food systems.

BUS/FRE 311 Business French Intensive training in French for business and commercial purposes, emphasizing specialized forms and vocabulary.

FRE/LIT 315 Readings in French Literature I Readings in French literature, from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE/LIT 316 Readings in French Literature II Readings in French literature, focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE/HIS 328 Provencal History and Culture through its Monuments Introduction to the History of Provence and a study of its most exemplary monuments. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

FRE 331 Contemporary France: Society, Politics, and Culture Study of contemporary French civilization through political, cultural, and social issues.

FRE 335 The Phonetics of Contemporary French Phonetic theory illustrated by aural practice and pronunciation. Intensive practice in sound reproduction and fine-tuning the ear to new sound combinations.

FRE/LIT 340 French Children's Literature: Exploring Language, Culture, and Society This course focuses on the way French children’s literature explores the creativity of language (with wordplay, for example) and the interaction between text and illustrations, while giving us an historical glimpse of French culture and society and of the underlying value system that pervades children’s literature. We will study classics (Le Petit Prince, Charles Perrault’s fairy tales, la Comtesse de Ségur) and more contemporary texts (Marcel Aymé, Daniel Pennac, Sempé).

BUS/FRE 341 Internship Internship positions in various enterprises from small local businesses to regional chains to multi-nationals with offices in the Aix area. Students usually work 10-12 hours per week on site, submitting regular written reports to their professors at IAU. An upper-intermediate level of French or higher is essential. Availability depends on company offers. Flexible hours according to your course schedule.

FRE/FLM 355 France as seen through its Movies, Post WWII to the 1970’s This course proposes an historical, cultural, and esthetic approach to French films made between the end of the second World War and the 1970s. How do the films describe the dominant elements of a society and how they witness as well as create these representations?

FRE/FLM 356 France as seen through its Movies, The 1980’s to Today Study of the different facets of France — from literary imagination to social issues, from the 1980’s to today — through a varied selection of films.

FRE/THE 357 Communication in French Theatre Course focuses on oral communication through reading, recitation, study, and interpretation of modern theatrical texts. Students will demonstrate elocution of French language with texts from playwrights as diverse as Beckett, Camus, Reza, and Delerme. Course develops strategies for more precise use of French for oral presentations or even job/internship interviews.

FRE/POL 376 Contemporary French Identities Examining some of the main points of division as well as of unity in France today, this course explores the republican ideal, its background, the crisis it is currently undergoing, and contemporary French identity(s).

FRE/LIT 383 Writing in Provence: Literature and Regional Culture How do writers whose subjects celebrate Provence and the interactions between its inhabitants and its visitors help students better comprehend their own immersion in the region and in the language? This course will guide students to analyze and write their own personal reflections inspired by regional writers such as Marcel Pagnol, Jean Giono, René Char, Maylis de Kérangal, Stendhal, and others.

FRE/LING/EDU 391 Acquisition of the French Language: History and Perspective This course asks students to step back and ask the question: “What happens when I’m learning French?” We will reveal a wider understanding of our own practices as learners, more specifically as learners of French. Students will be challenged to question their own preconceptions. More than a theoretical exercise, they will also be asked to put their ideas into practice. The course develops analytical, critical, and argumentative skills, requiring a precise use of the French language.

FRE 401 Translation and Structure I: from Colloquial to Literary Translation from English to French and French to English, with constant reference to technical, theoretical, and colloquial considerations.

FRE 402 Translation and Structure II: from Colloquial to Literary Translation from English to French and French to English, with constant reference to technical, theoretical, and colloquial considerations.

FRE/LIT/ART 411 Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context – 4 credits Course proposes an exploration of literary and artistic themes related to the notion of space, both personal (internal) and geographic (external), and specifically the tensions created by the crossing (“Traversée”) between one space and another.

FRE/LING 412 Contemporary French: The Linguistics of Everyday Language Course will reflect on and undertake a series of analyses on the language forms in current practice in French society. Analytical linguistics tools will be applied to usage in current-day, intercultural, youth, political, advertising, etc.

FRE/LIT/ART 413 Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context – 4 credits Course proposes an exploration of literary and artistic themes related to the notion of space, both personal (internal) and geographic (external), and specifically the tensions created by the crossing (“Traversée”) between one space and another.

FRE/LIT 414 France and Francophone Literature, a Dialogue Covering subjects such as the spirit of the desert, slavery, the Mediterranean, and the initiation journey, this course reflects on the ongoing dialogue between authors from France and authors from French-speaking countries of former colonial territories.

Bachelor of Arts in French Studies Only

Senior Capstone Course – Students in their final semester will choose a subject and advisor for the Senior Capstone Course. The candidate’s thesis will be supervised by their faculty advisor with additional oversight from the French department. Oral defense of the thesis will be conducted in front of the BA in French Studies committee at the end of the term.

Elective Independent Study – This course gives students the opportunity to explore an area of personal academic interest. Often, the idea for an independent study arises from an interest in a particular past course, such as HIS/COM 314: France during the Occupation. A student may develop an interest in the German presence in France and ask the instructor to supervise an independent study focused on this topic for the next semester. It’s recommended to propose one’s course of study a semester in advance, as a full semester may be required to design the course and its area of academic research.

History

HIS 301 European History: 1870–1918 Major social, economic, political, and diplomatic developments in European history from 1870 to 1918.

HIS 303 France and Europe in the Cold War Study of the evolution of the European societies from the post-war period to the fall of the Berlin Wall through arts, literature, architecture, alternative cultures, and social evolution linked to the exceptional economic growth of the post-war period ending with the oil shocks (1970’s).

HIS/SOC 304 Muslim Presence in Europe This course is an overview of the long-term interaction between the Muslim world and the West, not as two separate entities, but with emphasis on their historic commonality, and their dialectic relation. The course focuses on the debates regarding the Muslim population in Europe, covering concepts of religion and secularism, the history of Muslim populations in Europe, legal issues, human rights, feminism, and modernity. Field study will take us to specific sites in Marseille, historically linked with the Muslim community.

COM/HIS 314 France during the Occupation: 1939-1945 The study of representations of France during World War II in history, literature, and media, in both the Occupied and Unoccupied Zones, the German presence, the government in Vichy, and the Resistance. The course includes a review of French and European history from World War I until 1940, a detailed look at France's role in World War II, and a survey of French attitudes about the Occupation during the 70 years following Liberation. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

HIS/POL 321 French Colonialism in the Middle East and North Africa This class will examine the region’s contemporary political foundations, with a focus on how the recent colonial past has helped shape the political institutions that were recently toppled.

FRE/HIS 328 Provencal History and Culture through its Monuments Introduction to the History of Provence and a study of its most exemplary monuments. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

Internship

BUS/FRE 341 Internship Internship positions in various enterprises from small local businesses to regional chains to multi-nationals with offices in the Aix area. Students usually work 10-12 hours per week on site, submitting regular written reports to their professors at IAU. An upper-intermediate level of French or higher is essential. Availability depends on company offers. Flexible hours according to your course schedule.

Geography

Geography 375: Environmental Security and Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin The Mediterranean Basin January Term Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Italy, and Greece. Students build visual literacy in the history of art and archaeology as well as examine philosophical literature of the Mediterranean Basin from Antiquity to the Middle Ages. The seminar cultivates students' abilities to synthesize cultural, historical, political, and social information as it relates to the visual arts. The experiential learning component consists of a series of site visits made by academic experts from IAU in addition to local guides and faculty in the field of history, art history, and archaeology. See the Environmental Security and Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin J-Term on page 55 for additional details.

Literature

ENG 101 English Composition This course focuses on helping students gain confidence and proficiency in academic writing situations and to continue to develop useful life-long writing skills.

LIT/COM 312 Provençal Culture, from Myth to Media Representations of Provence across media, including myths and legends, memoirs, lyric poetry, literature, comics, film, television, and radio. Students will read texts about Provence from prominent authors and social scientists, and will engage in critical discussion of these texts in the light of their growing understanding of Provençal culture.

FRE/LIT 315 Readings in French Literature I Readings in French literature, from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE/LIT 316 Readings in French Literature II Readings in French literature, focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

LIT 325 The European Novel Course will explore the portrayal of shifting perspectives not only in terms of narrative style, but more assertively in terms of how life as a European shifted. We will examine changing social and political orders as well as how characters place themselves in history.

FRE/LIT 340 French Children's Literature: Exploring Language, Culture, and Society This course focuses on the way French children’s literature explores the creativity of language (with wordplay, for example) and the interaction between text and illustrations, while giving us an historical glimpse of French culture and society and of the underlying value system that pervades children’s literature. We will study classics (Le Petit Prince, Charles Perrault’s fairy tales, la Comtesse de Ségur) and more contemporary texts (Marcel Aymé, Daniel Pennac, Sempé).

LIT/COM/ANTH 375 The European City in Literature and the Visual Arts Exploration of the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilization through cinema, the novel, poetry, music, and paintings. Typically includes an excursion to sites in Paris.

FRE/LIT 383 Writing in Provence: Literature and Regional Culture How do writers whose subjects celebrate Provence and the interactions between its inhabitants and its visitors help students better comprehend their own immersion in the region and in the language? This course will guide students to analyze and write their own personal reflections inspired by regional writers such as Marcel Pagnol, Jean Giono, René Char, Maylis de Kérangal, Stendhal, and others.

FRE/LIT/ART 411 Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context – 4 credits Course proposes an exploration of literary and artistic themes related to the notion of space, both personal (internal) and geographic (external), and specifically the tensions created by the crossing (“Traversée”) between one space and another.

FRE/LIT/ART 413 Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context – 4 credits Course proposes an exploration of literary and artistic themes related to the notion of space, both personal (internal) and geographic (external), and specifically the tensions created by the crossing (“Traversée”) between one space and another.

FRE/LIT 414 France and Francophone Literature, a Dialogue Covering subjects such as the spirit of the desert, slavery, the Mediterranean, and the initiation journey, this course reflects on the ongoing dialogue between authors from France and authors from Frenchspeaking countries of former colonial territories.

Mathematics

MAT 201 Algebra I A review of real number systems, operations on polynomials and radicals, as well as the Pythagorean theorem and other geometric topics.

MAT 202 Algebra II The goal of the course is to prepare you for success in mathematical quantitative reasoning.

Political Science

POL 102 Introduction to American Politics This course is a critical introduction to American political institutions and behavior. Structurally the American system finds form in the Madisonian Model, the method of government established by the Framers and based on separation of powers, checks and balances, and overlapping centers of political power. Our system seeks to balance elite and mass interests, participation, and control.

POL 103 Political Theory Political Theory is chiefly concerned with how best to arrange our collective lives, with particular attention to the necessity for and rights and obligations of ‘rule,’ as well as the limits of that important power.

POL 105 Introduction to Comparative Politics This course provides a broad overview of the comparative politics subfield by focusing on important substantive questions about the world today.

POL 106 International Relations An introduction to contemporary analysis of international relations. Students will learn major theories of international relations and apply them to understand international situations and issues in the modern world.

IR/POL 303 International Relations Introduction to international relations with emphasis on how international relations have changed as a result of globalization. Typically includes an excursion to Geneva.

POL 307 The European Union: Integration, Enlargement, Unity Analysis of the historical evolution, the institutions, and the policies of the European Union within the context of European diplomatic history.

POL/ES 309 Global Environmental Politics Exploration of the main environmental problems facing the international community today with an analysis of the roles of states, international organizations, multinational corporations, and civil societies in the causation and solution process.

PHI/POL 312 Ethics in Society This course aims to help students discover ways to come to terms - both individually and collectively – with the tensions of living in a modern globalized society. It draws on the wisdom we inherit from a lineage of great teachers and thinkers in the past, from different traditions, to seek guidance on how to live better as citizens of the world, and as human beings, confronted by rapid technological change, cultural diversity, environmental degradation, organized violence, and economic insecurity.

POL 315 American Political Thought Two features are often said to distinguish American from European political thought: an “exceptional” commitment to liberal, democratic, or republican political ideals and institutions, and a “peculiar” attachment to racist, nativist, and imperialist political practices. This course traces the interaction of these two contradictory tendencies through the writings of prominent American political thinkers from the Founding to the present day, considering how each has informed Americans’ contributions to fundamental questions in political philosophy, to the design of constitutions and political institutions, and to the conduct of foreign affairs.

COM/IR 316 Media and Conflict This course examines the role media play in the progression and public perceptions of conflict. Relevant topics will include media and military intervention, portrayals of protest movements, and news and entertainment coverage of crime, rumors, domestic politics, violence, and ethnicity.

POL 318 Palestinian Israeli Conflict What are the origins of the conflict from the Israeli and Palestinian perspectives? What is the role of the outside actors? What role does religion play? What are the determinants of the possible future evolutions of the conflict? How do the United States and the European Union approaches to the conflict differ? This course equips students with the analytical tools and historical background to tackle these questions.

HIS/POL 321 French Colonialism in the Middle East and North Africa This class will examine the region’s contemporary political foundations, with a focus on how the recent colonial past has helped shape the political institutions that were recently toppled.

POL 321 Judicial Politics This course provides an introduction to the political science of law and courts, known as judicial politics. This is not a course on constitutional law, and the focus will not be on the development of legal doctrines or close readings of important cases (though we will discuss cases to illustrate and examine the topics of the course). Instead, we will evaluate law and courts as political institutions and judges as political actors and policy-makers.

POL 328 State Politics The course covers American federalism, state political institutions, elections and participation in state government, and finally public policy in the States.

POL 361 Nationalism and Contemporary World Politics The causes and consequences of nationalism.  Nationalism as a cause of conflict in contemporary world politics. Strategies for mitigating nationalist and ethnic conflict.

FRE/POL 376 Contemporary French Identities Examining some of the main points of division as well as of unity in France today, this course explores the republican ideal, its background, the crisis it is currently undergoing, and contemporary French identity(s).

Philosophy

PHI/POL 312 Ethics in Society This course aims to help students discover ways to come to terms - both individually and collectively – with the tensions of living in a modern globalized society. It draws on the wisdom we inherit from a lineage of great teachers and thinkers in the past, from different traditions, to seek guidance on how to live better as citizens of the world, and as human beings, confronted by rapid technological change, cultural diversity, environmental degradation, organized violence, and economic insecurity.

Photography

ART 110 Photography Intended for students with little or no experience in photography, this course is designed to introducephotography as a means of personal expression and quality composition of an image. Areas ofconcentration include: creativity, composition, basic computer/digital imaging/editing, and critiquing thework of others. Assumes no previous knowledge of photography. Assignments are to be completed with adigital camera.

ART 160/360 Photography: Philosophy and Practice of Vision A specific analysis of the photographic image in reference to the world history of photography to developstudents’ aesthetic judgments concerning their own production. Digital production around various themesrequired. Students are expected to bring a digital camera and a laptop.

Psychology

PSY 304 Human Development in Cultural Contexts Study of human development from a psychodynamic perspective. Draws extensively on the theories of such psychoanalytic thinkers as Freud, Melanie Klein, Wilfred Bion, and Donald Winnicott.

Religious Studies

REL 311 Early Christianity in Europe History of the first centuries of the Christian Church. Split between Judaism and Christianity, the influential theologians and leaders, heretical movements and their orthodox responses, waves of persecution and martyrdom, and cultural (role of women in the Early Church), artistic (oldest Christian monuments and artworks) and ecclesiastical topics (monasticism, liturgy…). Will conclude with a perspective of Modern World and focus on the Great Schism between East and West Christianity, the Avignon Papacy, the rise of Protestant movements.

REL 312 The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam This course is a comparative study of the three Abrahamic religions; Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. It examines the religions’ shared aspects as well as distinct elements. The course compares the three religions along thematic lines and examines the way these three major traditions impact the modern West and the Middle East specifically. Among the themes to be discussed are: Abraham, scripture and tradition, law, the creation, God, worship, mysticism, the house of God, the tradition of head covering, homosexuality, Jerusalem, and the end of times.

Spanish

SP 101 Beginning Spanish I – Spanish Language in Context This course is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Spanish. By the end of the course, the successful student will develop a basic foundation in these five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

SP 102 Beginning Spanish II – Spanish Language and Cultures This course is designed for students with very basic knowledge of Spanish. This course builds upon the skills acquired in SP 101. By the end of the course, the successful student will develop a basic foundation in these five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

SP 201 Intermediate Spanish I – Spanish Language in Context This course is designed for students with little prior knowledge of Spanish. Students who can already use a few basic words and phrases, and who can understand very simple requests, and responses are appropriate for this level. Students entering this course are also able to read and interpret the basic meaning of simple sentences and phrases. Students who have studied basic Spanish in high school or in college but never continued to build their skills may find this level appropriate. Students who have studied another Romance language may also be capable of entering this level. At the end of this 3-credit course students will be able to: express themselves in a variety of contexts, relate different pieces of information, establish cause and consequence, and converse with ease in limited formal and informal situations.

Sociology

HIS/SOC 304 Muslim Presence in Europe This course is an overview of the long-term interaction between the Muslim world and the West, not as two separate entities, but with emphasis on their historic commonality, and their dialectic relation. The course focuses on the debates regarding the Muslim population in Europe, covering concepts of religion and secularism, the history of Muslim populations in Europe, legal issues, human rights, feminism, and modernity. Field study will take us to specific sites in Marseille, historically linked with the Muslim community.

Wine Studies

WS 101 An Overview of Wine: 1 credit This course is designed to give an overview and understanding of the global wine industry. Coursework includes the history and culture of wine, wine vocabulary, label reading, selecting, and serving wine.

WS/MKT 302 Wine Marketing and Analysis This course is a combination of lecture and professional tasting to analyze the quality levels, marketing of wine, import and export, sales positioning, and pricing structures. Students will learn vineyard and winemaking techniques utilized to achieve certain styles of wine. Course includes field studies to wineries and vineyards.

WS/ECO 303 Regional Wine Trade and Economics This course examines the economic impact of the wine trade. Coursework includes studies in wine regions, styles, quality, analysis of regional market activities and promotion, current events, and specific tastings. Course includes field studies to wineries and vineyards. Extra fee required.

WS/ES 305 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Wine Production An introduction to the chemical and biochemical transformation of grapes into wine with highlights on the key steps in this process: growing conditions, timing of harvest, the fermentation process, wine conservation, and aging techniques. The course discusses equally environmental issues concerning the winemaking industry, especially the consequences of climate change and disposal of wineries’ wastes.

WS/HSP 307 Wine and Food Pairing for the Sommelier This course is a combination of lecture, professional tasting, and wine and food pairing. Students will learn vineyard and winemaking techniques utilized to achieve certain styles of wine, and how the structure of wine and food complete a pairing. Course includes field studies to restaurants, wineries, and to meet guest chefs.

WS/BUS 310 International Wine Trade This course provides students with an understanding of the business aspects of the global wine trade. Subjects include business planning, finance, supply chain management, wine as an alternative investment, and how the media affects the pricing and buyer/seller cycle of wine industry.

January Term Courses

Aix-en-Provence

  • Art 160/360: Photography - Philosophy and Practice of Vision
  • Business 304: Business Ethics in the Global Market
  • French 101: Beginner French I
  • French 102: Beginner French II
  • French 201: Intermediate French I
  • French 202: Intermediate French II
  • Psychology 334: Abnormal Psychology

ACM's January Term in Aix-en-Provence is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in the Mediterranean region of Southern France. A variety of courses are available to meet each student's academic needs. ACM's exceptional out-of-classroom experiences include homestays, regional field studies, and extracurricular activities such as wine tastings and cooking courses. Students have an immersive experience in the local culture during this intensive three-week program.

American Diplomacy

  • Political Science 345: American Diplomacy in Action – U.S. Engagement in the 21st Century
  • International Relations 345: American Diplomacy in Action – U.S. Engagement in the 21st Century
  • Cultural Studies 345: American Diplomacy in Action – U.S. Engagement in the 21st Century

This program is for students interested in learning about modern American diplomacy and the people who make it happen. Students go behind the scenes at U.S. embassies in Europe and North Africa to meet U.S. diplomats at the forefront of American engagement. Cultural visits, embassy briefings, and academic lectures by ACM scholars and resident experts place U.S. policies in their historic and geographic context, provide real-world examples of how American diplomats work, and explore the economic, security, and environmental issues they face.

Environmental Security and Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin

  • Environmental Studies 375: Environmental Security and Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin
  • International Relations 375: Environmental Security and Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin
  • Geography 375: Environmental Security and Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin

The Mediterranean Basin is home to nearly 500 million people and sustains some of the highest levels of endemic biodiversity in the world. This course first examines the nature of climate change, its causes, and the role it plays in regional security.  Second, the course examines the many efforts taking place to address these environmental and societal concerns. Emphasis is placed on issues such as climate change mitigation and adaptation, sustainable agriculture and food security, habitat destruction and wildlife conservation, water management and desertification, energy production and GHG emissions, as well as other efforts in sustainable development. Students explore the different initiatives, policies and perspectives surrounding these issues in the Mediterranean Basin through visits to international institutions, local businesses, and think tanks from Rome to Malaga.

Europe and the Islamic World

  • Art History 395: Classical Islam and the European Renaissance
  • Cross Cultural Studies 395: Jews, Muslims, and Christians in Europe and the Islamic World
  • French 395: Cultural History of France and the Islamic World 
  • History 395: Cultural History of Europe and the Islamic World 
  • Political Science 395: European Politics and the Islamic World 
  • Religious Studies 395: Jews, Muslims, and Christians in Europe and the Islamic World
  • Spanish 395: Cultural History of Spain and the Islamic World 

This seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Morocco, and Spain. Students participate in a series of briefings from leading academic, literary, and political experts on the European relationship with the Islamic world. In each city, students attend daily lectures and meetings with distinguished scholars from ACM in addition to local guides and experts in the fields of politics, art history, history, and culture. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications on the region.

Great Cities

  • European Studies 303: Europe and the Urban Space 
  • Anthropology 301: The Artist and the City 
  • Literature 375: The European City in Literature 
  • Communications 375: The European City in the Visual Arts 
  • Geography 201: Europe and its Cities

The Great Cities Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Italy, the Netherlands, and the Czech Republic. Students explore major cities across Europe using literature and the arts as a guide to understanding the rise and establishment of the urban setting. Through readings and media studies, students examine the artistic process from inspiration to creation. Site visits and guided tours then allow students to experience the historical, geographical, and demographical foundations that inform the fictional representations of European cities and their impact on perceptions of those cities today. Students have the opportunity to learn from and exchange their observations with experts from ACM as well as distinguished on-site scholars and local guides in order to frame their own perception of the cities and these cities’ representation through the arts. 

International Business

  • Management 325: International Management
  • Business 325: International Business
  • Marketing 325: International Marketing
  • Economics 325: Doing Business in Europe

The International Business Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Morocco, and Belgium. Students gain exposure to the diverse facets of international business while visiting countries at different stages of economic development. While in Europe and North Africa, students visit major multi-national organizations and locally-run businesses as well as meet with public officials responsible for economic policy in order to build a well-rounded understanding of the global market. Students have the opportunity to learn from and exchange their observations with experts from ACM as well as distinguished on-site scholars and local guides. 

Mediterranean Basin

  • Art History 385: Ancient and Medieval Classical Art and Architecture 
  • History 385: Ancient and Medieval Mediterranean Cultural History 
  • Archaeology 385: Greek and Roman Archaeology 
  • Cross Cultural Studies 385: Cultural Identities in Mediterranean Europe
  • Religious Studies 385: From Polytheism to Monotheism, The Early Christian Period in Italy, Greece, & Turkey 

The Mediterranean Basin January Term Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Italy, and Greece. Students build visual literacy in the history of art and archaeology as well as examine philosophical literature of the Mediterranean Basin from Antiquity to the Middle Ages. The seminar cultivates students' abilities to synthesize cultural, historical, political, and social information as it relates to the visual arts. The experiential learning component consists of a series of site visits made by academic experts from ACM in addition to local guides and faculty in the field of history, art history, and archaeology.

Religion Art and Architecture

  • Art History 325: Abrahamic Religions and their Places of Worship
  • Cross Cultural Studies 325: Abrahamic Religions and their Places of Worship
  • History 325: Abrahamic Religions and their Places of Worship
  • Religious Studies 325: Abrahamic Religions and their Places of Worship

ACM's January Term Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in Morocco, Spain, Turkey, and Israel. The program is a comparative study of the three Abrahamic religions; Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. It examines the religions’ shared aspects as well as distinct elements. The course compares the three religions and examines the way these three major traditions impact the modern West and the Middle East specifically.  Special attention will be given to the city of Jerusalem, where students will study and explore Jewish, Christian, and Islamic holy sites.

Shakespeare and the Theatre

  • Theatre 385: Shakespeare
  • Literature 385: Shakespeare
  • English 385: Shakespeare

There is no better place to study Shakespeare than on the banks of the Thames, the alleys of Eastcheap, and amidst the architecture and vistas that he knew. Although Shakespeare’s texts provide us with some of our richest literary experiences, the playwright hardly thought about publication. The theater was a living, money-making scheme, shaped by its location outside the city walls, by immediate political situations, and by the actors and patrons who entered the gates of the playhouse. This course teaches Shakespeare as one of history’s great artists – whose greatness was forged within the contingencies and pressures of the real world. Much of that world is still there to be studied and experienced.

Wine, Gastronomy, & Tourism of the Mediterranean

  • Business 302: Wine Marketing and Analysis
  • Business 306: The Global Wine Industry
  • Economics 303: Regional Wine Trade and Economics
  • Geography 303: Regional Wine Trade and Economics
  • Hospitality Management 307: Wine and Food Pairing
  • Wine Studies 302: Wine Marketing and Analysis
  • Wine Studies 303: Regional Wine Trade and Economics
  • Wine Studies 306: The Global Wine Industry
  • Wine Studies 307: Wine and Food Pairing

The Wine, Gastronomy, & Tourism of the Mediterranean Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France and Spain. This seminar examines the individuality and expression of the Mediterranean region’s rich culinary heritage. Topics include studies of the international influence of French and Spanish wine markets, globalization of wine, pairing of wine and food, and the ins-and-outs of the tourism industry. Students have the opportunity to taste French and Spanish wines and speak directly with winemakers, master chefs, and tourism agencies. Students visit various cultural sites in France and Spain as well as attend special lectures on winemaking and food pairing by ACM experts, master chefs, and sommeliers.