Master of Fine Arts

Master of Arts in French Studies

  Master of Arts in International Relations  

Master of Arts in Art History


Course Code Key

ANT
Anthropology

ARC
Archaeology

ARH
Art History

ART
Art

BUS
Business

CCS
Cross Cultural
Studies

COM
Communication
Studies

CUL
 Cultural Studies 

ECO
Economics

EDU
Education

ENG
English  

ES
Environmental
Science

FRE
French

GEO
 Geography 

HIS
History

HSP
Hospitality
Management

IR
International 
Relations

LING
Linguistics

LIT
Literature

PHI
Philosophy

POL
 Political Science 

REL
 Religious Studies 

SP
Spanish

THE
Theater

WS
 Wine Studies 


All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. 

Courses with an FRE, SP, or ARAB discipline are conducted either in French, Spanish, or Arabic, some of which are cross-listed with non-language disciplines. 300-level language courses or higher require previous completion of the 202 academic level prior to enrollment.

*There is no guarantee that all courses will be offered every semester. Please refer to your advisor for availability before choosing your courses each semester.

Master of Fine Arts

Core Courses

Drawing and Painting

ART 501: Drawing I - This course emphasizes the articulation of space and pictorial syntax. Class work is based on observational study. Assigned projects address fundamental technical and conceptual problems suggested by historical and recent artistic practice

ART 502: Drawing II - Studio practice and theory focusing on the nature of drawing and emphasizing the development of individual students' ideas and work. Systems and conventions of drawing and visual organization are explored in public open house presentations and final critiques with faculty members

ART 630: Painting I - This course introduces concepts and techniques in painting related to formal elements and the relationship between those elements and content.  Students will investigate color and drawing, light and volume, figuration and abstraction, and their relationship to content and form.

ART 632: Painting II - Further exploration of concepts and techniques in painting, with an emphasis on the individuation of the students' pictorial language in relation to perceptually based studio work and culminates in a ten day painting field study in Venice.

ART 633: Painting III - Development of individual themes and technical approaches through independent studio practice is emphasized. Studio work is complemented by group discussions within Critical Studies III Seminar.

ART 634: Painting IV - This course focuses on the individual formative process. Research, development, and thesis formulation are done under the aegis of an atelier in conjunction with independent practices

Critical Studies

ART 509: Art Criticism & Aesthetics Seminar I - The Art Criticism seminar offers the student access to a wide variety of images (architectural, sculptural, painted, etc.).  The objective of this course is to improve critical awareness and to refine judgment based on an exploration of universal principles through visual experience. The seminar focuses on the elements of form: color, value, light and volume.

ART 510: Art Criticism & Aesthetics Seminar II - The Art Criticism seminar offers the student access to a wide variety of images (architectural, sculptural, painted, etc.).  The objective of this course is to improve critical awareness and to refine judgment based on an exploration of universal principles through visual experience. The seminar takes students into an in-depth study of the elements of color, value, light and volume in their relation to content and form. Artworks and texts from varying periods and cultures throughout history are compared and contrasted to explore diverse issues such as the imagination, symbol in art, Zen principles in eastern art, motif, and tradition. Field studies are obligatory.

ART 511: Art Criticism & Aesthetics Seminar III - The Critical Studies courses are seminars in which students read and discuss criticism essays, artists' writings on art, and philosophical texts. They include field studies to museums, artist studios, and galleries. Critical studies I and II accentuate an overview of critical thought from past generations which will be used as a springboard for Critical Studies III, which accentuates modernist and postmodernist theory and will culminate in a final 15-page critical analysis paper. Critical Studies I II and III represent 6 credit-hours of critical and aesthetic analysis of multiple cultural and time period artistic achievements, 3 credit-hours of Independent research and analysis.

Thesis Practice and Thesis Project

ART 725: Thesis Practice (Fall) - Independent study with faculty oversight in preparation for Final Thesis project presentation. Students will complete and present the visual portion of their thesis which is expected to be a substantial body of completed work representing artistic achievement over the span of the program. The final Thesis Project will also include a 20-page process paper describing the MFA process as well as giving a critical defense of the representative works in the final MFA Exhibition. The Process paper will include an outline and annotated bibliography.  The final project will also include the presentation of journal work during the two-year process.  

ART 750: Thesis Project (Spring) - Continuation of independent study with faculty oversight in preparation for Final Thesis project presentation. Students will complete and present the visual portion of their thesis which is expected to be a substantial body of completed work representing artistic achievement over the span of the program. The final Thesis Project will also include a 20-page process paper describing the MFA process as well as giving a critical defense of the representative works in the final MFA Exhibition. The Process paper will include an outline and annotated bibliography.  The final project will also include the presentation of journal work during the two-year process.  

Art History

ART 520: Inquiry: Picasso, Matisse, and the Mediterranean - Cézanne, van Gogh, Matisse, and Picasso, the ‘greats’ of modern art, all spent significant time in the south of France. This course seeks to understand the development of modernism by exploring its Mediterranean origins. How did Mediterranean myth, history, and culture shape artistic production in the later 19th and 20th centuries? Special emphasis is placed on landscape and the nude as responses to the effects of Mediterranean sunlight and the traditional culture of the Midi (for example in bathing motifs), industrialization, colonialism, regionalism vs. nationalism, and an emerging tourist industry intent on exploiting a vision of the south as an exotic Arcadian paradise. The aim of this course is to help students gain a deeper understanding of art by exploring the origins of modern art in the south of France. We will consider the ways in which the work of avant-garde artists was shaped by ideas (both real and imagined) of the Mediterranean. Drawing on historical and literary sources, students will become familiar with the social, political, and economic background that led artists to seek out the south and choose southern subjects and themes. The innovative treatments of these themes will be examined in terms of a Mediterranean region conceived of as exotic and primitive, giving rise to such artistic movements as fauvism and cubism. Of special inspiration to Picasso and Matisse, the area’s classical past and proximity to the ‘Orient’ will also be discussed.

ART 540: Inquiry: Medieval Art and Architecture - A search for the medieval mind as it is expressed in Christian art and architecture from its earliest beginnings in the Catacombs of Rome, through the rich mosaics and domes of byzantine culture to the raising of the great Gothic Cathedrals in northern Europe. Typically includes excursions to regional sites.  The Middle Ages was a thousand-year period (ca. A.D. 400-1400) during which Europe was dominated by Christianity. During this period art was used almost exclusively in the service of the Church and illustrates the deep religious fervor of the age. This course will examine the development of architecture, painting, and sculpture during this long and fascinating period in European culture which divides Classical civilization from the beginnings of the development of modern culture during the Renaissance.

ART 541: Inquiry: Islamic Art and Architecture - This course surveys the arts and architecture of the Islamic World from the rise of the Umayyads in the 7th century CE until modern times.  It examines the social, historical and cultural contexts within which Islamic art and architecture developed.  It also explores the ways in which Islamic art interacted with the cultures and civilizations it came into contact both in the east and the west.  The aim of this course is to provide a basic understanding and a broad awareness of the major themes of Islamic art and architecture, of their main achievements and of their regional diversity.

ART 581: Inquiry: The XIXth Century and French Impressionism - An historical and critical analysis of French painting in the Nineteenth Century with a central focus on the birth and development of the Impressionist vision as embodied in specific works of art in relation to a contextual analysis of the movement in 19th and early 20th century art.  

ART 582: Inquiry: Cezanne and Van Gogh - An in-depth study of the work of Paul Cézanne and Vincent Van Gogh. The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for students to look more deeply into individual works of art, and to encourage them through their sustained, patient looking to discover the formal relationships that structure and reveal a work’s enduring presence. In addition, this course aims to: provide students with a comprehensive and nuanced presentation of Cézanne and Van Gogh within the context and evolution of 19th century painting; to model and encourage how to write more specifically and effectively about formal relationships that define the particular character of each work; and to explore the coherent, living order of a masterwork that continues to reveal new aspects of its being (in the sense of Aristotle’s Energeia) to each succeeding generation of observers.

ARC 509: Ancient European Art and Archaeology -  Development of European Mediterranean societies and civilizations from the arrival of the first humans up to the Roman conquest of the continent. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

ARC 510: Ancient Medieval Civilizations - Overview of the Mediterranean basin from the first civilizations in Egypt and Middle-East up to the Roman expansion over Europe. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence. This course deals with a survey of the Mediterranean basin and the different cultures that flourished there from the first civilizations in Egypt and Middle-East up to the Roman expansion over Europe. Particular emphasis on Southern France placed in a larger historical, artistic and archaeological context to show the main aspects of the multiple contacts, exchanges and cultural influences between Greeks, Celts and Romans in this area.

Electives

ART 551: Contemporary Studio Inquiry and Practice: The Sacred and Profane in Art - A Conceptual and Poetical Studio Practice Using a variety of media - drawing, painting, digital imagery, 3D and installation MFA candidates will explore the notions of the sacred and the taboo in art. The studio course will include an historical and theoretical study of these notions throughout the history of art with a prime focus on the 20th and 21st century.

ART 565: Advanced Digital Photography - This course is designed to reinforce the student’s knowledge in photography, using digital camera techniques as a means of personal expression. Observing/capturing, editing, printing and presenting will be addressed in relation to specific subjects, intentions and aesthetic judgements. The particular study abroad experience of each student will be a main focus throughout the semester. The goals of this course are develop students’ knowledge of the origins of photography from a philosophical and practical point of view the link between this knowledge and a practical and aesthetic use of the digital camera. The course will address some modern and contemporary photography to enhance student viewpoints in relation to subject and expression.  Students will be asked to question their own vision, what actually is involved in « making an image», and develop their critical sense in relation to their work and the work of their peers.

ART 570: Creative Writing - The creative writing process and studying abroad have much in common -- both require reflection and critical analysis in order to realize their fullest potential.  Lyrical sentences, vividly rendered images, or even the most interesting set of anecdotes in the world won't take the reader far if the writer doesn’t lend shape and meaning to the material.  The same is true for studying and living abroad.  In this class, we will focus on an intensive writing practice and we will deconstruct and explicate various elements of the essay (particularly those oriented toward exploring a “new” culture and “self” within an intercultural context).  We will explore the use of effective narrative distance and locating the narrator “on the page” in service of the story.  Furthermore, we will look at how our beliefs and perspectives inform our thinking and writing, and how living within another culture challenges those viewpoints and processes as writers.

ART 580: Arts Management - Arts Management requires students of the arts to reflect deeply, think critically, and write extensively about their work and working process in order to strengthen their ability to clearly articulate their ideas, aims and ambitions. The goal of the course is artistic professionalization such that students, upon leaving the MFA program, are more aptly prepared to enter the competitive domain of working artists. To enter this domain means being prepared to seek gallery representation; to secure grant funding, residencies or fellowships; and/or to teach at institutions of higher learning, among other possibilities.

ART 585: Sculpture -  How do we see ourselves? What makes us unique? How much do we communicate by facial expressions alone? Can you tell what a person is thinking by the way they look at you? What value do you place on hair? make-up? skin? What parts of your identity are associated with the way you look? How many selfies have you taken? This sculpture course will challenge master’s students to use limited materials in creative ways to tell their story – or the story of someone else. What can you communicate to your audience through a three-dimensional portrait? This course will engage students with a variety of common materials (paper, cardboard, tape, wire, plastilina and clay) and result in an exhibition through which our class will introduce themselves or their subjects to the community. What story will you tell? The purpose of the sculpture studio course is to develop the student's capacity to look at the world, as well as themselves, and to transform that vision into art through sculpture. Students will master technical skills which will allow them to continue their exploration of three-dimensional art into the future.

ART 595: Architecture Design Studio - Architecture is the art of designing spaces and experiences in built form. This studio design course will investigate the experiential qualities of architecture in and around Aix en Provence and at the Marchutz Art Studio, designed by architect Fernand Pouillon, to explore and develop architectural intuition. Working within the rich 17th and 18th century architectural traditions of Aix and the surrounding environs, students will use empirical study to develop a personal, authentic approach to design. This studio is designed to engage each student’s perception and design abilities in the completion of a real design project: a master plan for the Marchutz school. With a boots-on-the-ground approach common in all RAW workshops, students will learn collaboratively through on-site, hands on designing and creating.

ART 635: Ceramics - Intended for graduate students with or without experience in ceramics or pottery. Includes instruction in ceramics fundamentals, such as an understanding and the physical preparation of materials and beginning techniques in forming decorating ceramic pieces, as well as advanced instruction in a broad array of techniques, depending on the student’s individual pursuits and skill level. A course for students with beginning and advanced skills. The goal of the course is to develop the student's understanding of the materials and methods involved in the ceramic arts, and transform his/her understanding into artful ceramics pieces. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms through research and the challenges of preparation, production, alteration, decoration, and firing.

Language and Culture

FRE 101M: Practical Elementary French I - This course is designed for MFA candidates who have had little or no exposure to the French language. The goal is to establish essential skills in French and to build student confidence in using them through thematic exposure to the arts and participation in French daily life. Exercises in listening, oral expression, reading, vocabulary acquisition and grammatical clarification will improve the students’ comprehension, oral and spoken interactions. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

FRE 102M: Practical Elementary French II - This course is designed for the MFA candidate with at least one semester of college French or 3 years of high-school French. The goal of this course is to deepen the students’ knowledge of their competence in French. Through listening, reading and writing exercises, through grammatical clarification, vocabulary acquisition and thematic exposure to the arts, students will develop written and oral skills and improve their comprehension and their production. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

FRE 201M: Intermediate French I - This course is for MFA candidates with 2 semesters of College French. The course will deepen the student’s knowledge in French and teach them how to use French more efficiently and express complex ideas in a proper fashion. The emphasis will be placed on improving the students’ communication skills through oral and written exercises, conversations and discussions in class and thematic exposure to arts. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

FRE 202M: Intermediate French II - This course is designed for MFA candidates with at least three semesters of college French. The course will deepen the student’s knowledge in French and teach them how to use French more efficiently and express complex ideas in a proper fashion. The emphasis will be placed on improving the students’ communication skills through oral and written exercises, conversations, discussions, oral presentations and thematic exposure to arts. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

FRE 301M: Advanced French I: Structure and Expression - This course is designed for MFA Candidates with at least 4 semesters of college French. The course will deepen the students’ knowledge of French and teach them how to use French more efficiently and express complex ideas in a proper fashion. The emphasis will be placed on improving the students’ communication skills through oral and written exercises, conversations, discussions, oral presentations and thematic exposure to arts. In addition, the students will review and refine French grammar and syntax. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

January Term

ANT 501/LIT 575/COM 575: The Great Cities of Europe in Literature and Visual Arts Traveling Seminar - This course will explore the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilization. Literature and the arts will serve as our focal point. We will concentrate primarily on the late nineteenth-century up to the contemporary setting, more specifically on Rome, Aix-Marseille, Paris, Amsterdam, and Prague. We will explore a variety of media: poetry, novel, cinema and the fine arts.  Students will improve their capacity for rigorous, extended critical evaluation and build upon their foundation for critical discourse that will serve to prepare their research towards a Master’s Thesis. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 595/CCS 595/FRE 595/HIS 595/POL 595/REL 595/SPA 595: Europe and the Islamic World Traveling Seminar - The Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Morocco, Gibraltar, and Spain. The academic component consists of a series of briefings from leading European academic, literary and political personalities and experts on the European relationship with the Islamic world. Participants will spend 19 nights in 14 cities and will attend daily lectures and meetings with distinguished scholars in addition to local guides and experts in the field of politics, art history, history and culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the importance of North African immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

POL 545/IR 545/CUL 545: American Diplomacy in Action - U.S. Engagement in the 21st Century Traveling Seminar - This J-term is for students interested in learning about modern American diplomacy and the people who make it happen. Students will go behind the scenes at U.S. embassies in Europe and North Africa to meet U.S. diplomats at the forefront of American engagement. Cultural visits, Embassy briefings and academic lectures by scholars and resident experts will place U.S. policies in their historic and geographic context, provide real-world examples of how American diplomats work, and explore the economic, security and environmental issues they face. Students will combine political analysis of U.S. foreign policy with cultural and historical considerations, and will contrast multilateral and bilateral diplomacy and analyze the U.S. approach to both. In addition, students will integrate organizational and bureaucratic elements into their analysis of U.S. diplomacy.  This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 585/HIS 585/ARC 585/CCS 585/REL 585: Mediterranean Basin Traveling Seminar - This January Term (J-Term) Traveling Seminar promotes visual literacy in the history, art and archaeology as well as philosophical literature from the Mediterranean Basin from Antiquity to Middle Ages and the Renaissance period. It cultivates strong research and critical thinking skills, and develops students’ abilities to synthesize cultural, historical, political, and social information as it bears upon the visual arts. The academic component consists of a series of on-site studies made by academic experts from ACM in addition to local guides and experts in the field of history, art history and archaeology. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ENG 585/LIT 585/THE 585: Shakespeare and the Theatre - The purpose of this course is to provide a college level introduction to Shakespearean drama that will be stimulating, challenging, and enjoyable. Classes will be primarily discussion. Special emphasis will be placed on close reading, character development, poetry, and major themes. We will also visit key historical sites in order to better understand the political and intellectual circumstances in which Shakespeare was writing. Special attention will be paid to Shakespeare as a writer for the stage and a man of the theatre, with visits to theatres to hear and see plays, backstage tours, and critical discussions of directorial, design, and acting choices.  We will read four plays, there will be quizzes over the reading assignments, and students will write two 3 to 4 page essays. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 525/HIS 525/REL 525/CCS 525: Religion, Art, and Architecture Traveling Seminar: Abrahamic Religions and their Places of Worship - The January Term (J-Term) Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in Morocco, Spain, and Israel. The program is a comparative study of the three Abrahamic religions; Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It examines the religions’ shared aspects as well as distinct elements. The course compares the three religions and examines the way these three major traditions impact the modern West and the Middle East specifically. Special attention will be given to the city of Jerusalem, where students will study and explore Jewish, Christian and Islamic holy sites. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ES 575/IR 575: Environmental Security & Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin - Humanity has been present in the Mediterranean basin for millennia.  Today, it is home to nearly 500 million people and some of the highest levels of endemic biodiversity in the world.  Yet we can already witness how climate change and other more recent environmental ills are having serious impacts on human wellbeing and wildlife.  Increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, drought, and rising food prices can stress political and social stability.  While pressure on terrestrial and marine wildlife habitat and species from human disturbances, a changing climate, invasive species among others can seriously affect local economies.  This course will first examine the nature of these impacts, their causes, and the role they play in regional security.  Second, the course will examine the many efforts taking place to address these environmental and societal concerns.  Emphasis will be placed on issues such as climate change mitigation/adaptation, sustainable agriculture/food security, habitat destruction/wildlife conservation, water management/desertification, energy production and GHG emissions, as well as other efforts in sustainable development.  Visiting international institutions, businesses and think tanks from Rome to Malaga, we will explore the different efforts, initiatives, policies and perspectives around the Mediterranean basin. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

BUS 502/BUS 506/ECO 503/GEO 503/HSP 507/WS 502/WS 503/WS 506/WS 507: Wine, Gastronomy, and Tourism of the Mediterranean - The wine industry continues to develop as a global market force and France has long been considered the heart of wine production. Traveling to several Mediterranean wine regions, this seminar examines the individuality and expression and compares the wine, gastronomy and tourism industry in both France and Spain. Topics include the international influence of the wine market, globalization of wine, economic and trade aspects, gastronomical tourism, enotourism, along with cultural influences. Students will have the opportunity to speak directly with winemakers, vineyards, wine associations, retailers, restaurateurs, tourist organizations to fully experience the vast diversity of the wine industry.

Master of Arts in French Studies

Core Courses

FRE 588: Master’s Seminar: Critical Thought - The Masters of Arts in French Studies seminar includes all students enrolled in the Master of Arts in French Studies, no matter what their concentration is (Teaching French as a Foreign Language, Contemporary French Literature, Francophone World or International Relations). It is taught entirely in French and organized around the notion of “Critical Thought” through different perspectives: Sociolinguistic, Literary, Historic and Composite (Individual). It is composed of 4 units of 6 sections each. Each unit is taught by a different professor specializing in that specific domain. In this course, the notion of « Critical Thought » is envisioned as the capacity to develop one’s own thought from multiple external sources of knowledge and direct personal experiences.

FRE 589: Master’s Seminar: Methodologies - The Masters of Arts in French Studies seminar includes all students enrolled in the Master of Arts in French Studies, no matter what their concentration is (Teaching French as a Foreign Language, Contemporary French Literature, Francophone World or International Relations). It is taught entirely in French and is organized around the notion of “Methodology” envisioned according to different perspectives: Writing of university works, collection and analysis of given texts, Roland Barthes: a single “method” for approaching society, Don Juan’s “method:” a French critical mind. The seminar is composed of 4 units with 6 sections each. Each unit is taught by a different professor specializing in that specific domain.

FRE/LIT/ART 511: Crossing Spaces in the Intercultural Context - In this course, we will reflect on how the works of contemporary writers and artists - whose subjects relate to a) Outdoor Space, b) the Body c) the Other and d) the World - can help the students to better apprehend and understand/comprehend their study abroad experience and particularly their encounter with French society here in Aix-en-Provence. That is the primary question to be resolved for this class. Students will be requested to read excerpts from two literary reference texts: “Espèces d’Espaces” by novelist Georges Perec and “L’Espace du dedans” by poet Henri Michaux. Along with these texts, we will explore supplemental readings and the works of contemporary artists. (visual artists, playwrights, choreographers). We will develop each topic by taking into consideration the comprehension of sociocultural phenomena constituting the students’ new environment.

FRE/LING 512: Contemporary French: The Linguistics of Everyday Language - The purpose of this course is to understand the use of French in today’s daily practices or in specific social fields including but not limited to: informal speech, new words and slang, language used in advertisements, and political discourse. Students aim to understand the operations of interpretations of speakers and to articulate the organization of language (signs, lexical relationships) and real linguistic practices (situations of real-life statements). In addition, this course puts students in direct contact with the practices of French in today’s society, and how linguistics can help us to better understand and thus better utilize the multiple forms that words take. This course takes advantage of the opportunity of students’ linguistic and cultural immersion (and all the possibilities of direct observations and investigations they represent) to develop the speaking proficiency of the students.

FRE 501: Translation & Structure I: From Colloquial to Literature - This course is designed to provide advanced instruction and supervised practice in translation from English into French and from French into English. During the course, students will be working with texts of moderate to high difficulty. Several text typologies will be entertained: different extracts from novels, short stories, and poems in both languages. The course includes both theory and supervised practice of translation. Using the selected texts, we will explore the challenges linked to the place of the individual in contemporary society: identity and family relationships, identity and relationships with others, social condition, normalcy and collective consciousness. These challenges become especially apparent in the study and practice of translation, as students will come to realize during the semester.

FRE/HIS/EDU 591: Acquisition of the French Language: History and Perspectives - Any student’s main cognitive activity is learning. Despite its familiarity, this word refers to an extremely complex phenomenon. This course asks students to step back and ask the question: “What happens when I’m learning French?” How to study efficiently to meet my goals? How, knowing explaining is the highest level of understanding, would I teach if I were an instructor?” In this general context, learning a foreign language is yet a specific process. But what is a language? What do we learn in a foreign language classroom? How do the various methods used to teach a foreign language reflect the beliefs of a time? Why would the history of the language matter in all that? We will reveal a wider understanding of our own practices as learners, more specifically as learners of French. More than a theoretical exercise, they will also be asked to put their ideas into practice.  As they question their preconceptions, students are challenged to reconnect to their daily intellectual lives, which fosters a sense of higher understanding & overall logic.

FRE/LIT 514: French and Francophone Literature: A Dialogue - This course will reflect on and explore the incessant dialogue(s) between literary expressions of the French language. Indeed, we find in this field, French authors and authors coming from countries formerly of the French colonial empire, consisting of North Africa, Central Africa, Indochina, or DOM-TOMs. How does one approach these relationships today, during the time of postcolonial studies? How does one assess the contradicting problems of these relationships? Who are the authors that, within their personal methodology, and thus, of their literary space, record and allow one to rethink these relationships in extreme complexity? The question of identity will establish the transversal link between the works and the problems studied. Students will read and discover a large variety of types of texts: short stories, novels, and poetry from different sources of origin such as: Algeria, Senegal, Guadalupe, Indochina, and France.

FRE/LIT 540: French Children’s Literature: Exploring Language, Culture, and Society - This course focuses on the way French children’s literature explores the creativity of language (with wordplay, for example) and the interaction between text and illustrations, while giving us an historical glimpse of French culture and society and of the underlying value system that pervades children’s literature. We will study classics (Le Petit Prince, Charles Perrault’s fairy tales, la Comtesse de Ségur) and more contemporary texts (Marcel Aymé, Daniel Pennac, Sempé) to offer a comprehensive view of this literary category. The very varied books selected for this course aim at demonstrating how this literature touches on numerous literary genres and traditions.

FRE/LIT/LING 583: Writing in Provence: Literature & Regional Culture - This course uses contemporary and modern literary, written, and visual works that celebrate Provence, depict encounters with inhabitants and travelers in the region, and define light forms of resistance. Literary works will be used as a way to better understand students’ immersion in Provence while specifically working on developing the students’ French language skills. Students will be invited to read and write personal and singular experiences in Provence guided by their inspiration from Provencal authors. They will discover literature works of Marcel Pagnol, Jean Giono, René Char, Jean-Claude Izzo, Maylis de Kérangal, Jacqueline de Romilly, Albert Londres, James Sacré and Stendhal. In addition, they will watch films from famous and well-celebrated French directors such as Marcel Pagnol, Robert Guédigian, Jean-Paul Rappeneau and Claude Berry, as well as documentaries from Joëlle Gardes. Different themes will be developed so that students understand how their time in Provence provides them with deep reflection on how they fit into in a particular place and in a specific space.

FRE 576: Contemporary French Identities - The main objective of this course, entirely conducted in French, is to acquire knowledge of the state of contemporary French society, in its cultural, social, and political aspects. Even though it served as a paradigm of social organization for two centuries, the legacy of the Revolution is now crumbling, at the beginning of the 21st century. At a time when France is undergoing an identity crisis as much as an economic crisis, the myth of the death of the nation is prevalent, and many intellectuals believe that the project set forth by the Republic is no longer viable. However, France has already experienced comparable crisis in the past, as was the case during the decolonization era. Examining the challenges that the French face today and the ways by which there are currently renegotiating their identity will allow the students to better understand and appreciate the evolution of the French national narrative.

HIS/FRE 528: Provencal History Through its Monuments - Provence is a unique geographical space: a vast opening on the Mediterranean Sea, with a very contrasted climate and vegetation often threatened by wildfires. This space often explains the human organization of landscapes. The history of Provence is very rich and very ancient, and has put in place a complex cultural region, at times mixed with continental and Mediterranean, Greek, Gaulois, and Roman, along with today’s relationships with other countries of the Mediterranean basin. This course approaches the history of Provence under an artistic (painting and sculpture) and architectural angle where the different monuments studied will be used as a foundation for the understanding of Provençal civilization.

ART 520: Picasso, Matisse and the Mediterranean -  Cézanne, van Gogh, Matisse, and Picasso, the ‘greats’ of modern art, all spent significant time in the south of France. This course seeks to understand the development of modernism by exploring its Mediterranean origins. How did Mediterranean myth, history, and culture shape artistic production in the later 19th and 20th centuries? Special emphasis is placed on landscape and the nude as responses to the effects of Mediterranean sunlight and the traditional culture of the Midi (for example in bathing motifs), industrialization, colonialism, regionalism vs. nationalism, and an emerging tourist industry intent on exploiting a vision of the south as an exotic Arcadian paradise. The aim of this course is to help students gain a deeper understanding of art by exploring the origins of modern art in the south of France. We will consider the ways in which the work of avant-garde artists was shaped by ideas (both real and imagined) of the Mediterranean. Drawing on historical and literary sources, students will become familiar with the social, political, and economic background that led artists to seek out the south and choose southern subjects and themes. The innovative treatments of these themes will be examined in terms of a Mediterranean region conceived of as exotic and primitive, giving rise to such artistic movements as fauvism and cubism. Of special inspiration to Picasso and Matisse, the area’s classical past and proximity to the ‘Orient’ will also be discussed.

ART 582: Cézanne and Van Gogh - An in-depth study of the work of Paul Cézanne and Vincent Van Gogh. The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for students to look more deeply into individual works of art, and to encourage them through their sustained, patient looking to discover the formal relationships that structure and reveal a work’s enduring presence. In addition, this course aims to: provide students with a comprehensive and nuanced presentation of Cézanne and Van Gogh within the context and evolution of 19th century painting; to model and encourage how to write more specifically and effectively about formal relationships that define the particular character of each work; and to explore the coherent, living order of a masterwork that continues to reveal new aspects of its being (in the sense of Aristotle’s Energeia) to each succeeding generation of observers.

BUS 503: Intercultural Management - This course is designed to introduce students to concepts and fundamentals of international management. The course will consider aspects of management within an international and culturally complex environment, while considering the business influences within the global workplace. Students with or without prior international management knowledge will benefit from the course. Organizational effectiveness demands that personnel do the right things efficiently. Therefore, the role of management is to strive for and maintain the goals of the organization. Being an effective manager is not just telling others what to do. It is also about effective leadership, training, and communication. Having effective managers can be a cost saving tool for all organizations of all sizes. Corporation executives, supervisors, and managers are aware of the importance of and difficulty in finding and retaining highly skilled employees (a time-consuming role of management).

HIS 501: European History: 1870-1918 - This course examines the major social, economic, political and diplomatic developments in European history during the so-called long nineteenth century, meaning the period from 1789 (the start of the French Revolution) to 1918 (the end of the "Great War," World War One). This course will cover the period 1789-1918.  It will concentrate primarily on the historical experience of France, Germany, Britain, Italy, the Ottoman Empire and Russia with occasional attention paid to other European nations. The course attempts to balance political, social, and cultural history. The different topics will be covered on the basis of the study of text extracts, maps and pictures (paintings, cartoons...).

HIS/IR/POL 521: Contemporary Politics of the Middle East - This course is an introduction to contemporary Middle Eastern politics. The main objective is to provide students with historical background and theoretical tools to address the main issues facing the region. The course tackles the following core themes: The persistence of Authoritarianism in the region, the context and reasons that led to the “Arab spring,” what accounts for the prominence of Political Islam, the structural reasons behind the region economic underdevelopment, the prospect for liberal or illiberal democracy in the region, the international spillover effect of the region’s instability, and the roots of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict and its prospects.

IR/POL 503: International Relations - International relations encompass more today than just relations between governments. This course will place the emphasis on the various actors in international relations. Central to the course are utilizing the advantage of living abroad for a semester. This includes following closely current events and attending local conferences. Students will write short papers and give presentations, while reading assigned texts and drawing frequently on Franco-American relations as a case study.

IR/COM 516: Media and Conflict - The course will provide a structured approach to address different media systems. It will explore the dynamics of news, politics, conflicts and freedom of the press. Focusing on ongoing, international crises of global importance, we will examine how various international media report on topics including armed conflicts, human rights abuses. We will study the dynamics governing news media environment and structures. We will try to understand why different audiences from different cultural spheres perceive the same news in sometimes a diametrically opposed way. We will examine the rich arsenal of repression tools used by authoritarian and even democratic regimes to suppress press freedom or spin news to their advantage. We will look at the ways and means by which courageous journalists try to circumvent these obstacles.

PHI/POL 512: Political Ethics - From the perspective of selected topical issues of politics and society, students will be encouraged to develop an enhanced critical awareness of how major political and social thinkers in the past have treated the relationship between individual and society. The course will thus include the study of prominent texts in moral and political philosophy (from Plato and Aristotle to authors of the twentieth century), but it will also aim directly to improve students’ analytical skills for understanding conflicts that commonly arise in the practice of citizenship, while also helping them to develop a finer appreciation the significance of social change and of cultural diversity, in an emergent global society.

POL/IR 508: Geopolitics of the Mediterranean Basin: Security in a Diverse Region - France is both a founding member of the European Union and an historic and active actor in the Mediterranean basin. Aix-en-Provence was founded by a Mediterranean people – the Romans, in support of another Mediterranean people – the Greeks. Living and studying in Aix-en-Provence gives students first-hand experience of one of the many identities that encompass the Mediterranean basin. This culturally diverse region has been connected for millennia by a shared geographic space. It has created some of the greatest monuments to human intelligence and creativity, and at times has been a cauldron of violence and instability. Students will read texts on the geopolitical issues facing the countries of the Mediterranean basin today as well as analyze contemporary policies to have a better understanding of the future of this fascinating region.

LIT 525: The European Novel - During the nineteenth century the realist novel had become the dominant form for depicting an evolving society and its mores. As the twentieth century dawned, would-be novelists began questioning the codes of realism and experimented with new techniques to explore more authentic versions of individual and social experience. The European novel in the twentieth century casts doubt on traditional elements of the novel form: an eventful plot and stories of dramatic adventure, the heroic protagonist, an omniscient reliable narrator, a purely rational approach to human psychology, and the capacity of language to capture the real. In this course, we will consider the evolution of the novel looking at some of the major social, philosophical and literary developments of the twentieth century: from point of view, verisimilitude and "impressionist" thought through existentialism and its aftermath to the open-ended approach as the reader becomes the subject of the author's work.

FRE541: Internship - During the fall semester, and during the spring semester if they choose, students may be placed in internships in various organizations or businesses in the immediate region, that correspond to the students’ chosen track of study. Students will receive three credits for their internship submitting regular reports to their advisor.

FRE542: Research Internship - During the spring or summer terms students may elect to do a research internship to help inform their master’s thesis. This is particularly recommended for students who select the track “Teaching French as a Foreign Language.” These students seek out organizations (public or private schools, institutions) at which they may interact with students and professionals and collect data to aid specifically in their thesis research.

FRE599: Final Research Thesis – 4 credits - Students in their final semester will choose a subject and advisor for the Final Research Thesis Project. The candidate’s thesis will be supervised by their faculty advisor with additional oversight from the French department. Oral defense of the thesis will be conducted in front of the MA in French Studies committee at the end of the term.

January Term

ANT 501/COM 575/LIT 575: The Great Cities of Europe in Literature and Visual Arts Traveling Seminar - This course will explore the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilization. Literature and the arts will serve as our focal point. We will concentrate primarily on the late nineteenth-century up to the contemporary setting, more specifically on Rome, Aix-Marseille, Paris, Amsterdam, and Prague. We will explore a variety of media: poetry, novel, cinema and the fine arts.  Students will improve their capacity for rigorous, extended critical evaluation and build upon their foundation for critical discourse that will serve to prepare their research towards a Master's Thesis. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 595/CCS 595/FRE 595/HIS 595/POL 595/REL 595/SPA 595: Europe and the Islamic World Traveling Seminar - The Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Morocco, Gibraltar, and Spain. The academic component consists of a series of briefings from leading European academic, literary and political personalities and experts on the European relationship with the Islamic world. Participants will spend 19 nights in 14 cities and will attend daily lectures and meetings with distinguished scholars in addition to local guides and experts in the field of politics, art history, history and culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the importance of North African immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

CUL 545/IR 545/POL 545: American Diplomacy in Action - U.S. Engagement in the 21st Century Traveling Seminar - This J-term is for students interested in learning about modern American diplomacy and the people who make it happen. Students will go behind the scenes at U.S. embassies in Europe and North Africa to meet U.S. diplomats at the forefront of American engagement. Cultural visits, Embassy briefings and academic lectures by scholars and resident experts will place U.S. policies in their historic and geographic context, provide real-world examples of how American diplomats work, and explore the economic, security and environmental issues they face. Students will combine political analysis of U.S. foreign policy with cultural and historical considerations, and will contrast multilateral and bilateral diplomacy and analyze the U.S. approach to both. In addition, students will integrate organizational and bureaucratic elements into their analysis of U.S. diplomacy.  This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARC 585/ARH 585/CCS 585/HIS 585/REL 585: Mediterranean Basin Traveling Seminar - This January Term (J-Term) Traveling Seminar promotes visual literacy in the history, art and archaeology as well as philosophical literature from the Mediterranean Basin from Antiquity to Middle Ages and the Renaissance period. It cultivates strong research and critical thinking skills, and develops students’ abilities to synthesize cultural, historical, political, and social information as it bears upon the visual arts. The academic component consists of a series of on-site studies made by academic experts from ACM in addition to local guides and experts in the field of history, art history and archaeology. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ENG 585/LIT 585/THE 585: Shakespeare and the Theatre - The purpose of this course is to provide a college-level introduction to Shakespearean drama that will be stimulating, challenging, and enjoyable. Classes will be primarily discussion. Special emphasis will be placed on close reading, character development, poetry, and major themes. We will also visit key historical sites in order to better understand the political and intellectual circumstances in which Shakespeare was writing. Special attention will be paid to Shakespeare as a writer for the stage and a man of the theatre, with visits to theatres to hear and see plays, backstage tours, and critical discussions of directorial, design, and acting choices.  We will read four plays, there will be quizzes over the reading assignments, and students will write two essays, two-three pages in length. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 525/CCS 525/HIS 525/REL 525: Religion, Art, and Architecture Traveling Seminar: Abrahamic Religions and their Places of Worship - The January Term (J-Term) Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in Morocco, Spain, and Israel. The program is a comparative study of the three Abrahamic religions; Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It examines the religions’ shared aspects as well as distinct elements. The course compares the three religions and examines the way these three major traditions impact the modern West and the Middle East specifically. Special attention will be given to the city of Jerusalem, where students will study and explore Jewish, Christian and Islamic holy sites. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ES 575/IR 575: Environmental Security & Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin - Humanity has been present in the Mediterranean basin for millennia.  Today, it is home to nearly 500 million people and some of the highest levels of endemic biodiversity in the world.  Yet we can already witness how climate change and other more recent environmental ills are having serious impacts on human wellbeing and wildlife.  Increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, drought, and rising food prices can stress political and social stability.  While pressure on terrestrial and marine wildlife habitat and species from human disturbances, a changing climate, invasive species among others can seriously affect local economies.  This course will first examine the nature of these impacts, their causes, and the role they play in regional security.  Second, the course will examine the many efforts taking place to address these environmental and societal concerns.  Emphasis will be placed on issues such as climate change mitigation/adaptation, sustainable agriculture/food security, habitat destruction/wildlife conservation, water management/desertification, energy production and GHG emissions, as well as other efforts in sustainable development.  Visiting international institutions, businesses and think tanks from Rome to Malaga, we will explore the different efforts, initiatives, policies and perspectives around the Mediterranean basin. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

BUS 502/BUS 506/ECO 503/GEO 503/HSP 507/WS 502/WS 503/WS 506/WS 507: Wine, Gastronomy, and Tourism of the Mediterranean - The wine industry continues to develop as a global market force and France has long been considered the heart of wine production. Traveling to several Mediterranean wine regions, this seminar examines the individuality and expression and compares the wine, gastronomy and tourism industry in both France and Spain. Topics include the international influence of the wine market, globalization of wine, economic and trade aspects, gastronomical tourism, enotourism, along with cultural influences. Students will have the opportunity to speak directly with winemakers, vineyards, wine associations, retailers, restaurateurs, tourist organizations to fully experience the vast diversity of the wine industry.

Master of Arts in International Relations

Core Courses

POL/IR 504: Theories of International Relations - This course will review the history and progression of International Relations theory from the founding period of the discipline in the interwar period of the 20th Century until the current period.  We will examine realism (both classical and structural), liberalism, constructivism, Marxism, feminism, critical theory, green theory, post-structuralism, the English school and postcolonial theory.

POL 510: Comparative Politics - This is an introductory course in the study of comparative politics. It addresses the concepts, ideas, and analytical tools necessary to understand and analyses the processes of state formation, the nature of political regimes and the role of political actors. The study of the core concepts of comparative politics is followed by a close look at country cases. Students will be acquainted with the political history of these countries. They will study the interactions between State institutions and the civil society. They will analyse the determinants of their political evolution and the characteristics that set them apart. Case studies are mostly drawn from Europe and the Middle East and North Africa region.

POL/IR 512: Ethics in International Relations - The course is designed to introduce students to the increasing range and density of ethical issues affecting international relations on a global scale, and to develop their skills of analysis and critical evaluation in assessing practical consequences of such issues, especially in order to find moral solutions applicable in the making and implementation of foreign policy, as well as in the conduct of inter-personal and private cross-border relationships. We shall follow R.B.J. Walker's injunction to treat ethics as immanent to international relations, not as a disjoined separate discipline confined to philosophy. In other words, we shall assume that the theory of international relations itself 'is already constituted through accounts of ethical possibility' (Walker). Students will need first, therefore, to be acquainted with the history and nature of ethical discourse and its contemporary relevance to political community, particularly as a source of limitation on prevailing ideas of sovereignty, citizenship, national identity and justice. This will entail synoptic study of prominent contributors in the past to the formulation of universally-applicable theories of ethics in relation to political community, including Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Kant. For the most part, however, students will be encouraged to engage in interactive class discussion, and to facilitate it from time to time, on a selection of key topical issues which demonstrate the pertinence of universal moral theory on an international dimension. The choice of issues may vary according to students' interests, and current relevance, but will normally cover some aspects of the following: human rights; migration and refugees; prevention of nuclear warfare; terrorism; effects of climate change and possible preventive measures; mistreatment of women and children; economic inequality; rights of minorities; religious intolerance.

ECO 501: International Economics & the European Union - The course examines critically the challenges to economic governance and policy presented by 'globalisation' of markets and increasing economic integration on a world scale. In particular,it will help students make a realistic and informed assessment of the success of the European Union as a model of regional economic integration which is designed to meet those same challenges - a model that is unique but which has been used in the formation of other regional entities in other parts of the world. Relevant theories of trade and development will be tested critically leading to an introductory analysis, in an historical perspective, of the customs union, internal market, economic and monetary union, freedom of movement of labour, along with other foundations of European Union, such as its policies for: external trade and development; competition between enterprises; economic, social and territorial cohesion; agriculture, environmental protection and technologically-induced, ecologically-friendly growth. Due attention will be given to the key role in integration of common institutions and the legal framework, and to the effects of successive enlargements of membership of the EU.

POL/FRE 576: Contemporary French Identities - The main objective of this course, entirely conducted in French, is to acquire knowledge of the state of contemporary French society, in its cultural, social, and political aspects. Even though it served as a paradigm of social organization for two centuries, the legacy of the Revolution is now crumbling, at the beginning of the 21st century. At a time when France is undergoing an identity crisis as much as an economic crisis, the myth of the death of the nation is prevalent, and many intellectuals believe that the project set forth by the Republic is no longer viable. However, France has already experienced comparable crisis in the past, as was the case during the decolonization era. Examining the challenges that the French face today and the ways by which there are currently renegotiating their identity will allow the students to better understand and appreciate the evolution of the French national narrative.

HIS/SOC 504: Muslim Presence in Europe - This course is an overview of the long-term interaction between the Muslim world and the West, not as two separate entities, but with emphasis on their historic commonality, and their dialectic relation.  The course focuses on the debates regarding the Muslim population in Europe, covering concepts of religion and secularism, the history of Muslim populations in Europe, legal issues, human rights, feminism, and modernity.  Field studies will take us to specific quarters in Marseille, historically linked with the Muslim community, and to Arrahma Mosque in Istres.

HIS 503: France and Europe in the Cold War: Economy, Culture, Society, and Politics (1945-1989) - The main objective of the course is to acquire general knowledge of European history between 1945 and 1989, in its cultural, social, economic and political aspects. The history of Europe between 1945 and 1989 can be understood through the prism of Cold War history: Western Europe on one side, Eastern Europe and Soviet influence on the other side. The second objective is to contribute to a better understanding and analysis of Europe, in its contemporary complexity and diversity.

POL/IR 508: Geopolitics of the Mediterranean Basin: Security in a Diverse Region - France is both a founding member of the European Union and an historic and active actor in the Mediterranean basin. Aix-en-Provence was founded by a Mediterranean people – the Romans, in support of another Mediterranean people – the Greeks. Living and studying in Aix-en-Provence gives students first-hand experience of one of the many identities that encompass the Mediterranean basin. This culturally diverse region has been connected for millennia by a shared geographic space. It has created some of the greatest monuments to human intelligence and creativity, and at times has been a cauldron of violence and instability. Students will read texts on the geopolitical issues facing the countries of the Mediterranean basin today as well as analyze contemporary policies to have a better understanding of the future of this fascinating region.

POL 518: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict - This course addresses the causes and evolution of the Arab-Israeli conflict from the 19th century to the present. It provides an in-depth understanding of the conflict by exploring its history and the narratives of the parties. We will follow a timeline beginning with the inception of the conflict. We will study the 1948 War, the various armed confrontation which pitted Israel against its neighboring countries. We will address the various attempts at peace. We will do so by addressing the international, historical and political developments. A particular focus of the course will be the Israeli and Palestinian societies, their history and their culture.   

POL/COM 516: Media and Conflict - The course will provide a structured approach to address different media systems. It will explore the dynamics of news, politics, conflicts and freedom of the press. Focusing on ongoing, international crises of global importance, we will examine how various international media report on topics including armed conflicts, human rights abuses. We will study the dynamics governing news media environment and structures. We will try to understand why different audiences from different cultural spheres perceive the same news in sometimes a diametrically opposed way. We will examine the rich arsenal of repression tools used by authoritarian and even democratic regimes to suppress press freedom or spin news to their advantage. We will look at the ways and means by which courageous journalists try to circumvent these obstacles.

POL/ES 509: Global Environmental Politics - The contemporary global environmental questions, including issues such as global climate change, biodiversity loss, deforestation, desertification and ocean acidification, are among the major concerns for the international community. As we are becoming increasingly aware of the consequences of our activities on our environment, on our civilization and ultimately on our lives, every year, numerous initiatives are launched to counter the ills we have already caused and to prevent further degradation. These include national and international legislations and laws, periodic meetings between international actors and decision makers in addition to worldwide events organized by grassroots movements involving thousands of local and international organizations.

POL/IR 547: International Negotiation: Theory and Practice - This course will explore modern methods of negotiation in business and politics, and how they are utilized in international relations.  It will make extensive use of case studies, and explore the role of cross-cultural communications in international negotiations. International negotiations are one of the primary ways states and non-state actors resolve their differences.  In a globalizing world, there are those who argue that negotiations are gradually replacing violent conflict between states as the main tool used to mediate conflicts.  Others note that violence is still present, although increasingly it is located in civil conflicts that make special demands on negotiators.  Regardless of whether or not we are entering an era of low interstate violence, negotiations across cultures, boundaries and societies is an enduring feature of 21st century economics and politics.  

POL 542 : Internship – Summer Term - At the end of the spring semester, students will be placed in internships in various government and non-government organizations or international businesses in the immediate region. The ACM network includes places such as the US Consulate, City Hall, the Chamber of Commerce, l’Office du Tourisme, Maritime Organizations in Marseille, the International Red Cross, crisis relief agencies for immigrants, and many others. Students will receive four credits for their internship submitting regular reports to their advisors with a final report in July.

POL 599 : Master’s Thesis - Students will work closely with their chosen track advisor on a Master’s Thesis to be submitted no later than July 1st after the completion of their coursework. Students will attend graduation ceremony in May but will only receive their diploma upon the submission and successful completion of their Master’s Thesis.

Language Courses

ARAB 101→102: Elementary Modern Standard Arabic - 6 credits - An introduction to the phonology and writing system of modern standard Arabic, its basic vocabulary and structure. Students will learn foundations of Arabic script and build vocabulary to read and engage in simple conversation.

FRE 101 → 102: Practical Elementary French I then II - 6 credits - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those with little or no previous study. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ workshops and activities. Development of an understanding of oral French through listening and speaking practices.

FRE 102 → 201: Practical Elementary French II then Intermediate French I - 6 credits - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those who have completed the equivalent of one semester of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ practical workshops and activities. Development of an understanding of oral French through dialogue and role playing.

FRE 201 → 202: Intermediate French I then II - 6 credits - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those who have completed the equivalent of two semesters of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ practical workshops and activities. Development of oral French through conversation.

FRE 202: Intermediate French II - 4 credits - Intended for those who have completed the equivalent of three semesters of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning. Development of oral French through conversation.

FRE 211: Living in France: Intercultural Communication - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two to three semesters of college level French. Intensive focus on oral practice looking at popular French culture.

FRE 218: France, Francophonie, and Music - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two to three semesters of college level French. Intensive focus on linguistic and cultural comprehension as well as oral expression through music in France and throughout the Francophone world.

FRE 301: Advanced French I: Structure and Expression - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of four semesters or two years of college level French. Advanced written and oral practice and grammar review. Essay topics follow a simulation enriched with a variety of documentation and multimedia activities.

FRE 302: Advanced French II: Conversation and Composition - Intended for student who have completed the equivalent of five semesters of college level. Students improve their advanced command of oral and written French.

FRE/BUS 311: Business French - Intensive training in French for business and commercial purposes, emphasizing specialized forms and vocabulary.

FRE 335: The Phonetics of Contemporary French - Phonetic theory illustrated by aural practice and pronunciation. Intensive practice in sound reproduction and fine-tuning the ear to new sound combinations.

FRE 401: Translation and Structure I: From Colloquial to Literary - Translation from English to French and French to English, with constant reference to technical, theoretical, and colloquial considerations.

FRE 402: Translation and Structure II: From Colloquial to Literary - Translation from English to French and French to English, with constant reference to technical, theoretical, and colloquial considerations.

FRE 306: Cross-Cultural Studies in Food and Culture - Both the Mediterranean diet and French Gastronomy have been declared by UNESCO as world heritage. This course will explore the language and the culinary customs of French cuisine, examining differences in food patterns between the US and France, the fundamentals of French and regional food and eating, including the history, and use of ingredients, as well as political and economic factors affecting rural French food systems.

FRE/LIT 315: Readings in French Literature I - Readings in French literature, from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE/LIT 316: Readings in French Literature II - Readings in French literature, focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE 331: Contemporary France: Society, Politics, and Culture - Study of contemporary French civilization through political, cultural, and social issues.

FRE/FLM 355: France as seen through its Movies, post WWII to the 1970’s - This course proposes an historical, cultural, and esthetic approach to French films made between the end of the second World War and the 1970s. How do the films describe the dominant elements of a society and how they witness as well as create these representations?

FRE/FLM 356: France as seen through its Movies, The 1980’s to Today - Study of the different facets of France — from literary imagination to social issues, from the 1980’s to today — through a varied selection of films.

FRE/THE 357: Communication in French Theatre - Course focuses on oral communication through reading, recitation, study, and interpretation of modern theatrical texts. Students will demonstrate elocution of French language with texts from playwrights as diverse as Beckett, Camus, Reza, Delerme. Course develops strategies for more precise use of French for oral presentations or even job/internship interviews.

FRE/HIS 328: Provencal History and Culture through its Monuments - Introduction to the History of Provence and a study of its most exemplary monuments. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

FRE/LIT 340 (in French): French Children's Literature: Exploring Language, Culture, and Society - This course focuses on the way French children’s literature explores the creativity of language (with wordplay, for example) and the interaction between text and illustrations, while giving us an historical glimpse of French culture and society and of the underlying value system that pervades children’s literature. We will study classics (Le Petit Prince, Charles Perrault’s fairy tales, la Comtesse de Ségur) and more contemporary texts (Marcel Aymé, Daniel Pennac, Sempé).

FRE/LIT 383: Writing in Provence: Literature and Regional Culture - How writers whose subjects celebrate Provence and the interactions between its inhabitants and its visitors help students better comprehend their own immersion in the region and in the language? This course will guide students to analyze and write their own personal reflections inspired by regional writers such as Marcel Pagnol, Jean Giono, René Char, Maylis de Kérangal, Stendhal and others.

FRE/LING/EDU 391: Acquisition of the French Language: History and Perspective - This course asks students to step back and ask the question: “What happens when I’m learning French?” We will reveal a wider understanding of our own practices as learners, more specifically as learners of French. Students will be challenged to question their own preconceptions. More than a theoretical exercise, they will also be asked to put their ideas into practice. The course develops analytical, critical, and argumentative skills, requiring a precise use of the French language.

FRE/LING 412: Contemporary French: The Linguistics of Everyday Language - Course will reflect on and undertake a series of analyses on the language forms in current practice in French society. Analytical linguistics tools will be applied to usage in current-day, intercultural, youth, political, advertising, etc.  

FRE/LIT 414: France and Francophone Literature, a Dialogue - Covering subjects such as the spirit of the desert, slavery, the Mediterranean and the initiation journey, this course reflects on the ongoing dialogue between authors from France and authors from French-speaking countries of former colonial territories.

SP 101: Beginning Spanish I – Spanish Language in Context - This course is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Spanish. By the end of the course, the successful student will develop a basic foundation in the five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening and speaking.

SP 102: Beginning Spanish II – Spanish Language and Cultures - This course is designed for students with very basic knowledge of Spanish. This course builds upon the skills acquired in SP101. By the end of the course, the successful student will develop a basic foundation in the five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening and speaking.

SP 201: Intermediate Spanish I – Spanish Language in Context - This course is designed for students with little prior knowledge of Spanish. Students who can already use a few basic words and phrases, and who can understand very simple requests and responses are appropriate for this level. Students entering this course are also able to read and interpret the basic meaning of simple sentences and phrases. Students who have studied basic Spanish in high school or in college but never continued to build their skills may find this level appropriate. Students who have studied another Romance language may also be capable of entering this level. At the end of this 3-credit course students will be able to: express themselves in a variety of contexts, relate different pieces of information, establish cause and consequence, and converse with ease in limited formal and informal situations.

January Term Courses

ANT 501/LIT 575/COM 575: The Great Cities of Europe in Literature and Visual Arts Traveling Seminar - This course will explore the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilization. Literature and the arts will serve as our focal point. We will concentrate primarily on the late nineteenth-century up to the contemporary setting, more specifically on Rome, Aix-Marseille, Paris, Amsterdam, and Prague. We will explore a variety of media: poetry, novel, cinema and the fine arts.  Students will improve their capacity for rigorous, extended critical evaluation and build upon their foundation for critical discourse that will serve to prepare their research towards a Master's’ Thesis. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 595/CCS 595/FRE 595/HIS 595/POL 595/REL 595/SPA 595: Europe and the Islamic World Traveling Seminar - The Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Morocco, Gibraltar, and Spain. The academic component consists of a series of briefings from leading European academic, literary and political personalities and experts on the European relationship with the Islamic world. Participants will spend 19 nights in 14 cities and will attend daily lectures and meetings with distinguished scholars in addition to local guides and experts in the field of politics, art history, history and culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the importance of North African immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

POL 545/IR 545/CUL 545: American Diplomacy in Action - U.S. Engagement in the 21st Century Traveling Seminar - This J-term is for students interested in learning about modern American diplomacy and the people who make it happen. Students will go behind the scenes at U.S. embassies in Europe and North Africa to meet U.S. diplomats at the forefront of American engagement. Cultural visits, Embassy briefings and academic lectures by IAU and ACM scholars and resident experts will place U.S. policies in their historic and geographic context, provide real-world examples of how American diplomats work, and explore the economic, security and environmental issues they face. Students will combine political analysis of U.S. foreign policy with cultural and historical considerations, and will contrast multilateral and bilateral diplomacy and analyze the U.S. approach to both. In addition, students will integrate organizational and bureaucratic elements into their analysis of U.S. diplomacy.  This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 585/HIS 585/ARC 585/CCS 585/REL 585: Mediterranean Basin Traveling Seminar - This January Term (J-Term) Traveling Seminar promotes visual literacy in the history, art and archaeology as well as philosophical literature from the Mediterranean Basin from Antiquity to Middle Ages and the Renaissance period. It cultivates strong research and critical thinking skills, and develops students’ abilities to synthesize cultural, historical, political, and social information as it bears upon the visual arts. The academic component consists of a series of on-site studies made by academic experts from ACM in addition to local guides and experts in the field of history, art history and archaeology. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ENG 585/LIT 585/THE 585: Shakespeare and the Theatre - The purpose of this course is to provide a college level introduction to Shakespearean drama that will be stimulating, challenging, and enjoyable. Classes will be primarily discussion. Special emphasis will be placed on close reading, character development, poetry, and major themes. We will also visit key historical sites in order to better understand the political and intellectual circumstances in which Shakespeare was writing. Special attention will be paid to Shakespeare as a writer for the stage and a man of the theatre, with visits to theatres to hear and see plays, backstage tours, and critical discussions of directorial, design, and acting choices.  We will read four plays, there will be quizzes over the reading assignments, and students will write two 3 to 4 page essays. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 525/HIS 525/REL 525/CCS 525: Religion, Art, and Architecture Traveling Seminar: Abrahamic Religions and their Places of Worship - The January Term (J-Term) Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in Morocco, Spain, and Israel. The program is a comparative study of the three Abrahamic religions; Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It examines the religions’ shared aspects as well as distinct elements. The course compares the three religions and examines the way these three major traditions impact the modern West and the Middle East specifically. Special attention will be given to the city of Jerusalem, where students will study and explore Jewish, Christian and Islamic holy sites. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ES 575/IR 575: Environmental Security & Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin - Humanity has been present in the Mediterranean basin for millennia.  Today, it is home to nearly 500 million people and some of the highest levels of endemic biodiversity in the world.  Yet we can already witness how climate change and other more recent environmental ills are having serious impacts on human wellbeing and wildlife.  Increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, drought, and rising food prices can stress political and social stability.  While pressure on terrestrial and marine wildlife habitat and species from human disturbances, a changing climate, invasive species among others can seriously affect local economies.  This course will first examine the nature of these impacts, their causes, and the role they play in regional security.  Second, the course will examine the many efforts taking place to address these environmental and societal concerns.  Emphasis will be placed on issues such as climate change mitigation/adaptation, sustainable agriculture/food security, habitat destruction/wildlife conservation, water management/desertification, energy production and GHG emissions, as well as other efforts in sustainable development.  Visiting international institutions, businesses and think tanks from Rome to Malaga, we will explore the different efforts, initiatives, policies and perspectives around the Mediterranean basin. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

BUS 502/BUS 506/ECO 503/GEO 503/HSP 507/WS 502/WS 503/WS 506/WS 507: Wine, Gastronomy, and Tourism of the Mediterranean - The wine industry continues to develop as a global market force and France has long been considered the heart of wine production. Traveling to several Mediterranean wine regions, this seminar examines the individuality and expression and compares the wine, gastronomy and tourism industry in both France and Spain. Topics include the international influence of the wine market, globalization of wine, economic and trade aspects, gastronomical tourism, enotourism, along with cultural influences. Students will have the opportunity to speak directly with winemakers, vineyards, wine associations, retailers, restaurateurs, tourist organizations to fully experience the vast diversity of the wine industry.


Master of Arts in Art History

Core Courses

ART 509: Critical Studies I - The Art Criticism seminar offers the student access to a wide variety of images (architectural, sculptural, painted, etc.).  The objective of this course is to improve critical awareness and to refine judgment based on an exploration of universal principles through visual experience. The seminar focuses on the elements of form: color, value, light and volume.

ART 510: Critical Studies II - The Art Criticism seminar offers the student access to a wide variety of images (architectural, sculptural, painted, etc.).  The objective of this course is to improve critical awareness and to refine judgment based on an exploration of universal principles through visual experience. The seminar takes students into an in-depth study of the elements of color, value, light and volume in their relation to content and form. Artworks and texts from varying periods and cultures throughout history are compared and contrasted to explore diverse issues such as the imagination, symbol in art, Zen principles in eastern art, motif, and tradition. Field studies are obligatory.

ART 700: Thesis Research Paper - Students will work closely with their chosen track advisor on a Master’s Thesis to be submitted no later than July 1st after the completion of their coursework. Students will attend graduation ceremony but will only receive their diploma upon the submission and successful completion of their Master’s Thesis.

ART 701: Art Internship - At the end of the Spring semester, students will be placed in internships in various museums and galleries in the region including the renowned Atelier Cézanne and the Musée Granet in Aix-en- Provence. Students will receive three credits for their internship submitting regular reports to their advisors with a final report in July

ART 505: Painting and Drawing Studio - Includes work from the figure, museum study, still life and landscape work in the Aix countryside. A course for students with intermediate/advanced skills. The goal of the course is to develop the student's capacity to see into the visible world and transform his/her vision into art. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms through the challenges of museum study, landscape, portraiture, model work, and still life. Instruction is individualized and adapted to each student's needs and interests. Painting and drawing are taught concurrently and are complementary.

ART 551: Contemporary Studio Inquiry and Practice: The Sacred and Profane in Art - A Conceptual and Poetical Studio Practice - Using a variety of media - drawing, painting, digital imagery, 3D and installation MFA candidates will explore the notions of the sacred and the taboo in art. The studio course will include an historical and theoretical study of these notions throughout the history of art with a prime focus on the 20th and 21st century.

ART 565: Advanced Digital Photography - This course is designed to reinforce the student’s knowledge in photography, using digital camera techniques as a means of personal expression. Observing/capturing, editing, printing and presenting will be addressed in relation to specific subjects, intentions and aesthetic judgements. The particular study abroad experience of each student will be a main focus throughout the semester. The goals of this course are to develop students’ knowledge of the origins of photography from a philosophical and practical point of view the link between this knowledge and a practical and aesthetic use of the digital camera. The course will address some modern and contemporary photography to enhance student viewpoints in relation to subject and expression.  Students will be asked to question their own vision, what actually is involved in « making an image», and develop their critical sense in relation to their work and the work of their peers.

ART 570: Creative Writing - The creative writing process and studying abroad have much in common -- both require reflection and critical analysis in order to realize their fullest potential.  Lyrical sentences, vividly rendered images, or even the most interesting set of anecdotes in the world won't take the reader far if the writer doesn’t lend shape and meaning to the material.  The same is true for studying and living abroad.  In this class, we will focus on an intensive writing practice and we will deconstruct and explicate various elements of the essay (particularly those oriented toward exploring a “new” culture and “self” within an intercultural context).  We will explore the use of effective narrative distance and locating the narrator “on the page” in service of the story.  Furthermore, we will look at how our beliefs and perspectives inform our thinking and writing, and how living within another culture challenges those viewpoints and processes as writers.

ART 585: Sculpture - How do we see ourselves? What makes us unique? How much do we communicate by facial expressions alone? Can you tell what a person is thinking by the way they look at you? What value do you place on hair? make-up? skin? What parts of your identity are associated with the way you look? How many selfies have you taken? This sculpture course will challenge master’s students to use limited materials in creative ways to tell their story – or the story of someone else. What can you communicate to your audience through a three-dimensional portrait? This course will engage students with a variety of common materials (paper, cardboard, tape, wire, plastilina and clay) and result in an exhibition through which our class will introduce themselves or their subjects to the community. What story will you tell? The purpose of the sculpture studio course is to develop the student's capacity to look at the world, as well as themselves, and to transform that vision into art through sculpture. Students will master technical skills which will allow them to continue their exploration of three-dimensional art into the future.

ART 595: Architectural Design Studio - Architecture is the art of designing spaces and experiences in built form. This studio design course will investigate the experiential qualities of architecture in and around Aix en Provence and at the Marchutz Art Studio, designed by architect Fernand Pouillon, to explore and develop architectural intuition. Working within the rich 17th and 18th century architectural traditions of Aix and the surrounding environs, students will use empirical study to develop a personal, authentic approach to design. This studio is designed to engage each student’s perception and design abilities in the completion of a real design project: a master plan for the Marchutz school. With a boots-on-the-ground approach common in all RAW workshops, students will learn collaboratively through on-site, hands on designing and creating.

ART 635: Ceramics - Intended for graduate students with or without experience in ceramics or pottery. Includes instruction in ceramics fundamentals, such as an understanding and the physical preparation of materials and beginning techniques in forming decorating ceramic pieces, as well as advanced instruction in a broad array of techniques, depending on the student’s individual pursuits and skill level. A course for students with beginning and advanced skills. The goal of the course is to develop the student's understanding of the materials and methods involved in the ceramic arts, and transform his/her understanding into artful ceramics pieces. The student is led gradually toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between natural and artistic forms through research and the challenges of preparation, production, alteration, decoration, and firing.

ART 520: Picasso, Matisse, and the Mediterranean - Cézanne, van Gogh, Matisse, and Picasso, the ‘greats’ of modern art, all spent significant time in the south of France. This course seeks to understand the development of modernism by exploring its Mediterranean origins. How did Mediterranean myth, history, and culture shape artistic production in the later 19th and 20th centuries? Special emphasis is placed on landscape and the nude as responses to the effects of Mediterranean sunlight and the traditional culture of the Midi (for example in bathing motifs), industrialization, colonialism, regionalism vs. nationalism, and an emerging tourist industry intent on exploiting a vision of the south as an exotic Arcadian paradise. The aim of this course is to help students gain a deeper understanding of art by exploring the origins of modern art in the south of France. We will consider the ways in which the work of avant-garde artists was shaped by ideas (both real and imagined) of the Mediterranean. Drawing on historical and literary sources, students will become familiar with the social, political, and economic background that led artists to seek out the south and choose southern subjects and themes. The innovative treatments of these themes will be examined in terms of a Mediterranean region conceived of as exotic and primitive, giving rise to such artistic movements as fauvism and cubism. Of special inspiration to Picasso and Matisse, the area’s classical past and proximity to the ‘Orient’ will also be discussed.

ART 540: Medieval Art and Architecture - A search for the medieval mind as it is expressed in Christian art and architecture from its earliest beginnings in the Catacombs of Rome, through the rich mosaics and domes of byzantine culture to the raising of the great Gothic Cathedrals in northern Europe. Typically includes excursions to regional sites.  The Middle Ages was a thousand-year period (ca. A.D. 400-1400) during which Europe was dominated by Christianity. During this period art was used almost exclusively in the service of the Church and illustrates the deep religious fervor of the age. This course will examine the development of architecture, painting, and sculpture during this long and fascinating period in European culture which divides Classical civilization from the beginnings of the development of modern culture during the Renaissance.

ART 541: Islamic Art of Europe - This course surveys the arts and architecture of the Islamic World from the rise of the Umayyads in the 7th century CE until modern times.  It examines the social, historical and cultural contexts within which Islamic art and architecture developed.  It also explores the ways in which Islamic art interacted with the cultures and civilizations it came into contact both in the east and the west.  The aim of this course is to provide a basic understanding and a broad awareness of the major themes of Islamic art and architecture, of their main achievements and of their regional diversity.

ART 581: The 19th Century and Impressionism - An historical and critical analysis of French painting in the Nineteenth Century with a central focus on the birth and development of the Impressionist vision as embodied in specific works of art in relation to a contextual analysis of the movement in 19th and early 20th century art.  

ART 582: Cézanne and Van Gogh, An In-Depth Study - An in-depth study of the work of Paul Cézanne and Vincent Van Gogh. The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for students to look more deeply into individual works of art, and to encourage them through their sustained, patient looking to discover the formal relationships that structure and reveal a work's enduring presence. In addition, this course aims to: provide students with a comprehensive and nuanced presentation of Cézanne and Van Gogh within the context and evolution of 19th century painting; to model and encourage how to write more specifically and effectively about formal relationships that define the particular character of each work; and to explore the coherent, living order of a masterwork that continues to reveal new aspects of its being (in the sense of Aristotle's energeia) to each succeeding generation of observers.

ARC 509: Ancient European Art and Archaeology - Development of European Mediterranean societies and civilizations from the arrival of the first humans up to the Roman conquest of the continent. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

ARC 510: Ancient Medieval Civilizations - Overview of the Mediterranean basin from the first civilizations in Egypt and Middle-East up to the Roman expansion over Europe. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence. This course deals with a survey of the Mediterranean basin and the different cultures that flourished there from the first civilizations in Egypt and Middle-East up to the Roman expansion over Europe. Particular emphasis on Southern France placed in a larger historical, artistic and archaeological context to show the main aspects of the multiple contacts, exchanges and cultural influences between Greeks, Celts and Romans in this area.

Language Courses

ARAB 101→102: Elementary Modern Standard Arabic - 6 credits - An introduction to the phonology and writing system of modern standard Arabic, its basic vocabulary and structure. Students will learn foundations of Arabic script and build vocabulary to read and engage in simple conversation.

FRE 101 M: Practical Elementary French I for Art Students - This course is designed for art students who have had little or no exposure to the French language. The goal is to establish essential skills in French and to build student confidence in using them through thematic exposure to the arts and participation in French daily life. Exercises in listening, oral expression, reading, vocabulary acquisition and grammatical clarification will improve the students’ comprehension, oral and spoken interactions. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

FRE 102 M: Practical Elementary French II for Art Students - This course is designed for art students with at least one semester of college French or 3 years of high-school French. The goal of this course is to deepen the students’ knowledge of their competence in French. Through listening, reading and writing exercises, through grammatical clarification, vocabulary acquisition and thematic exposure to the arts, students will develop written and oral skills and improve their comprehension and their production. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

FRE 101 → 102: Practical Elementary French I then II - 6 credits - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those with little or no previous study. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ workshops and activities. Development of an understanding of oral French through listening and speaking practices.

FRE 102 → 201: Practical Elementary French II then Intermediate French I - 6 credits - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those who have completed the equivalent of one semester of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ practical workshops and activities. Development of an understanding of oral French through dialogue and role playing.

FRE 201 M: Intermediate French I for Art Students - This course is for art students with 2 semesters of College French. The course will deepen the student’s knowledge in French and teach them how to use French more efficiently and express complex ideas in a proper fashion. The emphasis will be placed on improving the students’ communication skills through oral and written exercises, conversations and discussions in class and thematic exposure to arts. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

FRE 201 → 202: Intermediate French I then II - 6 credits - A year of college credit in one semester intended for those who have completed the equivalent of two semesters of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning tied to two hours’ practical workshops and activities. Development of oral French through conversation.

FRE 202: Intermediate French II - 4 credits - Intended for those who have completed the equivalent of three semesters of college level French. Intensive four hours’ classroom learning. Development of oral French through conversation.

FRE 202 M: Intermediate French II for Art Students - This course is designed for art students with at least three semesters of college French. The course will deepen the student’s knowledge in French and teach them how to use French more efficiently and express complex ideas in a proper fashion. The emphasis will be placed on improving the students’ communication skills through oral and written exercises, conversations, discussions, oral presentations and thematic exposure to arts. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French.

FRE 211: Living in France: Intercultural Communication - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two to three semesters of college level French. Intensive focus on oral practice looking at popular French culture.

FRE 218: France, Francophonie, and Music - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of two to three semesters of college level French. Intensive focus on linguistic and cultural comprehension as well as oral expression through music in France and throughout the Francophone world.

FRE 301: Advanced French I: Structure and Expression - Intended for students who have completed the equivalent of four semesters or two years of college level French. Advanced written and oral practice and grammar review. Essay topics follow a simulation enriched with a variety of documentation and multimedia activities.

FRE 301 M: Advanced French I for Art Students - This course is designed for art students with at least 4 semesters of college French. The course will deepen the students’ knowledge of French and teach them how to use French more efficiently and express complex ideas in a proper fashion. The emphasis will be placed on improving the students’ communication skills through oral and written exercises, conversations, discussions, oral presentations and thematic exposure to arts. In addition, the students will review and refine French grammar and syntax. The student will get acquainted with culture in Aix-en-Provence, Provence and France and will acquire an understanding of French art, cuisine, customs and pastimes through exhibits, exposure to paintings and sculptures, newspaper and magazine articles, short literature excerpts and idioms. Content may slightly change according to the students’ level and the pace of the class. Class is taught in French

FRE 302: Advanced French II: Conversation and Composition - Intended for student who have completed the equivalent of five semesters of college level. Students improve their advanced command of oral and written French.

FRE/BUS 311: Business French - Intensive training in French for business and commercial purposes, emphasizing specialized forms and vocabulary.

FRE 335: The Phonetics of Contemporary French - Phonetic theory illustrated by aural practice and pronunciation. Intensive practice in sound reproduction and fine-tuning the ear to new sound combinations.

FRE 401: Translation and Structure I: From Colloquial to Literary - Translation from English to French and French to English, with constant reference to technical, theoretical, and colloquial considerations.

FRE 402: Translation and Structure II: From Colloquial to Literary - Translation from English to French and French to English, with constant reference to technical, theoretical, and colloquial considerations.

FRE 306: Cross Cultural Studies in Food and Culture - Both the Mediterranean diet and French Gastronomy have been declared by UNESCO as world heritage. This course will explore the language and the culinary customs of French cuisine, examining differences in food patterns between the US and France, the fundamentals of French and regional food and eating, including the history, and use of ingredients, as well as political and economic factors affecting rural French food systems.

FRE/LIT 315: Readings in French Literature I - Readings in French literature, from the 16th to the 18th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE/LIT 316: Readings in French Literature II - Readings in French literature, focusing on the 19th and 20th centuries, and introduction to methods of literary analysis for students with the equivalent of at least two years of college-level French.

FRE 331: Contemporary France: Society, Politics, and Culture - Study of contemporary French civilization through political, cultural, and social issues.

FRE/FLM 355: France as seen through its Movies, post WWII to the 1970’s - This course proposes an historical, cultural, and esthetic approach to French films made between the end of the second World War and the 1970s. How do the films describe the dominant elements of a society and how they witness as well as create these representations?

FRE/FLM 356: France as seen through its Movies, The 1980’s to Today - Study of the different facets of France — from literary imagination to social issues, from the 1980’s to today — through a varied selection of films.

FRE/THE 357: Communication in French Theatre - Course focuses on oral communication through reading, recitation, study, and interpretation of modern theatrical texts. Students will demonstrate elocution of French language with texts from playwrights as diverse as Beckett, Camus, Reza, Delerme. Course develops strategies for more precise use of French for oral presentations or even job/internship interviews.

FRE/HIS 328: Provencal History and Culture through its Monuments - Introduction to the History of Provence and a study of its most exemplary monuments. Typically includes excursions to sites in Provence.

FRE/LIT 340 (in French): French Children's Literature: Exploring Language, Culture, and Society - This course focuses on the way French children’s literature explores the creativity of language (with wordplay, for example) and the interaction between text and illustrations, while giving us an historical glimpse of French culture and society and of the underlying value system that pervades children’s literature. The classics (Le Petit Prince, Charles Perrault’s fairy tales, la Comtesse de Ségur) will be studied as will more contemporary texts (Marcel Aymé, Daniel Pennac, Sempé).

FRE/LIT 383: Writing in Provence: Literature and Regional Culture - How writers whose subjects celebrate Provence and the interactions between its inhabitants and its visitors help students better comprehend their own immersion in the region and in the language? This course will guide students to analyze and write their own personal reflections inspired by regional writers such as Marcel Pagnol, Jean Giono, René Char, Maylis de Kérangal, Stendhal and others.

FRE/LING/EDU 391: Acquisition of the French Language: History and Perspective - This course asks students to step back and ask the question: “What happens when I’m learning French?” We will reveal a wider understanding of our own practices as learners, more specifically as learners of French. Students will be challenged to question their own preconceptions. More than a theoretical exercise, they will also be asked to put their ideas into practice. The course develops analytical, critical, and argumentative skills, requiring a precise use of the French language.

FRE/LING 412: Contemporary French: The Linguistics of Everyday Language - Course will reflect on and undertake a series of analyses on the language forms in current practice in French society. Analytical linguistics tools will be applied to usage in current-day, intercultural, youth, political, advertising, etc.  

FRE/LIT 414: France and Francophone Literature, a Dialogue - Covering subjects such as the spirit of the desert, slavery, the Mediterranean and the initiation journey, this course reflects on the ongoing dialogue between authors from France and authors from French-speaking countries of former colonial territories.

SP 101: Beginning Spanish I – Spanish Language in Context - This course is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of Spanish. By the end of the course, the successful student will develop a basic foundation in the five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening and speaking.

SP 102: Beginning Spanish II – Spanish Language and Cultures - This course is designed for students with very basic knowledge of Spanish. This course builds upon the skills acquired in SP101. By the end of the course, the successful student will develop a basic foundation in the five skills: intercultural communication, reading, writing, listening and speaking.

SP 201: Intermediate Spanish I - Spanish Language in Context - This course is designed for students with little prior knowledge of Spanish. Students who can already use a few basic words and phrases, and who can understand very simple requests and responses are appropriate for this level. Students entering this course are also able to read and interpret the basic meaning of simple sentences and phrases. Students who have studied basic Spanish in high school or in college but never continued to build their skills may find this level appropriate. Students who have studied another Romance language may also be capable of entering this level. At the end of this 3-credit course students will be able to: express themselves in a variety of contexts, relate different pieces of information, establish cause and consequence, and converse with ease in limited formal and informal situations.

January Term

ANT 501/LIT 575/COM 575: The Great Cities of Europe in Literature and Visual Arts Traveling Seminar - This course will explore the rise and the establishment of the urban setting as the nexus of contemporary European culture and civilization. Literature and the arts will serve as our focal point. We will concentrate primarily on the late nineteenth-century up to the contemporary setting, more specifically on Rome, Aix-Marseille, Paris, Amsterdam, and Prague. We will explore a variety of media: poetry, novel, cinema and the fine arts.  Students will improve their capacity for rigorous, extended critical evaluation and build upon their foundation for critical discourse that will serve to prepare their research towards a Master's’ Thesis. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 595/CCS 595/FRE 595/HIS 595/POL 595/REL 595/SPA 595: Europe and the Islamic World Traveling Seminar - The Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in France, Morocco, Gibraltar, and Spain. The academic component consists of a series of briefings from leading European academic, literary and political personalities and experts on the European relationship with the Islamic world. Participants will spend 19 nights in 14 cities and will attend daily lectures and meetings with distinguished scholars in addition to local guides and experts in the field of politics, art history, history and culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the importance of North African immigration to Europe and its current socio-cultural implications. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

POL 545/IR 545/CUL 545: American Diplomacy in Action - U.S. Engagement in the 21st Century Traveling Seminar - This J-term is for students interested in learning about modern American diplomacy and the people who make it happen. Students will go behind the scenes at U.S. embassies in Europe and North Africa to meet U.S. diplomats at the forefront of American engagement. Cultural visits, Embassy briefings and academic lectures by scholars and resident experts will place U.S. policies in their historic and geographic context, provide real-world examples of how American diplomats work, and explore the economic, security and environmental issues they face. Students will combine political analysis of U.S. foreign policy with cultural and historical considerations, and will contrast multilateral and bilateral diplomacy and analyze the U.S. approach to both. In addition, students will integrate organizational and bureaucratic elements into their analysis of U.S. diplomacy.  This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 585/HIS 585/ARC 585/CCS 585/REL 585: Mediterranean Basin Traveling Seminar - This January Term (J-Term) Traveling Seminar promotes visual literacy in the history, art and archaeology as well as philosophical literature from the Mediterranean Basin from Antiquity to Middle Ages and the Renaissance period. It cultivates strong research and critical thinking skills, and develops students’ abilities to synthesize cultural, historical, political, and social information as it bears upon the visual arts. The academic component consists of a series of on-site studies made by academic experts from ACM in addition to local guides and experts in the field of history, art history and archaeology. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ENG 585/LIT 585/THE 585: Shakespeare and the Theatre - The purpose of this course is to provide a college level introduction to Shakespearean drama that will be stimulating, challenging, and enjoyable. Classes will be primarily discussion. Special emphasis will be placed on close reading, character development, poetry, and major themes. We will also visit key historical sites in order to better understand the political and intellectual circumstances in which Shakespeare was writing. Special attention will be paid to Shakespeare as a writer for the stage and a man of the theatre, with visits to theatres to hear and see plays, backstage tours, and critical discussions of directorial, design, and acting choices.  We will read four plays, there will be quizzes over the reading assignments, and students will write two 3 to 4 page essays. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ARH 525/HIS 525/REL 525/CCS 525: Religion, Art, and Architecture Traveling Seminar: Abrahamic Religions and their Places of Worship - The January Term (J-Term) Traveling Seminar is designed for students interested in an academic and cultural experience in Morocco, Spain, and Israel. The program is a comparative study of the three Abrahamic religions; Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It examines the religions’ shared aspects as well as distinct elements. The course compares the three religions and examines the way these three major traditions impact the modern West and the Middle East specifically. Special attention will be given to the city of Jerusalem, where students will study and explore Jewish, Christian and Islamic holy sites. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

ES 575/IR 575: Environmental Security & Sustainability in the Mediterranean Basin - Humanity has been present in the Mediterranean basin for millennia.  Today, it is home to nearly 500 million people and some of the highest levels of endemic biodiversity in the world.  Yet we can already witness how climate change and other more recent environmental ills are having serious impacts on human wellbeing and wildlife.  Increased temperatures, decreased precipitation, drought, and rising food prices can stress political and social stability.  While pressure on terrestrial and marine wildlife habitat and species from human disturbances, a changing climate, invasive species among others can seriously affect local economies.  This course will first examine the nature of these impacts, their causes, and the role they play in regional security.  Second, the course will examine the many efforts taking place to address these environmental and societal concerns.  Emphasis will be placed on issues such as climate change mitigation/adaptation, sustainable agriculture/food security, habitat destruction/wildlife conservation, water management/desertification, energy production and GHG emissions, as well as other efforts in sustainable development.  Visiting international institutions, businesses and think tanks from Rome to Malaga, we will explore the different efforts, initiatives, policies and perspectives around the Mediterranean basin. This course is interdisciplinary in nature.

BUS 502/BUS 506/ECO 503/GEO 503/HSP 507/WS 502/WS 503/WS 506/WS 507: Wine, Gastronomy, and Tourism of the Mediterranean - The wine industry continues to develop as a global market force and France has long been considered the heart of wine production. Traveling to several Mediterranean wine regions, this seminar examines the individuality and expression and compares the wine, gastronomy and tourism industry in both France and Spain. Topics include the international influence of the wine market, globalization of wine, economic and trade aspects, gastronomical tourism, enotourism, along with cultural influences. Students will have the opportunity to speak directly with winemakers, vineyards, wine associations, retailers, restaurateurs, tourist organizations to fully experience the vast diversity of the wine industry.